Don't call it a comeback: vinyl is on the up

14 April 2015

headphones There's been a lot of talk about the comeback of vinyl, as people start spending money on things in record shops, all over again.

This comeback has got some people so excited, that a special vinyl chart has been launched. Last year, vinyl sales hit a 20-year high in the UK, which is exciting enough. This new chart launches ahead of Record Store Day on Saturday.

Martin Talbot, the chief executive of the Official Charts Company, said: "With vinyl album sales up by almost 70% already this year,vinyl junkies could well have snapped up 2 million units by the end of this year - an extraordinary number, if you consider sales were one-tenth of that just six years ago."

Gennaro Castaldo, from industry body The BPI, said: "With sales of vinyl albums at their highest level since the heady days of Britpop and growing, the introduction of an Official Vinyl Chart at this time makes perfect sense."

"The chart will not only help us to better understand which artists and type of music are driving this resurgence, but will also help guide a new generation of younger, but emotionally-engaged, fans as they contemplate the vinyl delights that await them."

However, what no-one is saying is that the comeback isn't nearly as large as people are making out. Vinyl was virtually extinct at one point, which means sales don't have to be that high to break record sales for two decades.

We'll let this graph show you the truth of the matter.

vinyl-chart

 

As you can see, the late '80s and early '90s is when vinyl sales took a huge hit, thanks to the advent of CDs and cheap cassettes. While it is encouraging to see people buying vinyl again, sales are nowhere near the mid '70s peak. You can add into this that no-one buys CDs or cassettes either, which means physical sales are in a sorry state indeed.

Still, seeing as record companies ripped everyone off for years, you could argue that this is all payback.

TOPICS:   TV   Cool Stuff

1 comment

  • Han S.
    Record companies are still making massive amounts of money (Sony $463 million last year, UMG $648 million) so I fail to see in what way this is payback?

What do you think?

Connect with Facebook, Twitter, or just enter your email to sign in and comment.

Your comment