Will double decker trains solve the UK's commuting problem?

15 December 2014

traintrack Overcrowding is a problem on Britain's trains, with people rammed-on for journeys where your face is pressed into someone's armpit and the sound of a hundred Beats headphones leaking noise that sounds like mice duelling inside a biscuit tin.

Well, double-decker trains might be the answer.

Network Rail is weighing up the double stuffed trains for a number of peak services. They're also looking at building 'flyovers', so trains can bypass the busiest stations. One of the most likely solutions that is being looked at is narrower seats, so more people can be crammed into carriages.

A spokesman for Network Rail said: "It's right that as part of our plans to increase capacity we fully examine the costs and benefits of double-decker trains, alongside traditional engineering enhancements such as flyovers."

These proposals have been set out in a number of reports from Network Rail who are looking at ways to fix the problem of increasing passenger numbers.

It is clear they don't want to invest in more carriages on existing trains, but they'll need to do something as passenger figures are soaring. We all know they're going to go for the cheapest option, so expect less leg room in the coming years.

TOPICS:   Travel

2 comments

  • Euan
    Have seen double-decker trains in the Netherlands, seems utterly sensible - as long as the infrastructure can fit them, and I'm thinking more in terms of overhead height with bridges etc, as IIRC they did look a bit taller than regular trains.
  • Martin
    No space on many routes to do this, Ones with tunnels for instance.

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