Train prices go up by an average of 6.2% - don't expect a better service though

23 November 2010

trainTrain fares are going to rise by an average of 6.2 per cent, the Association of Train Operating Companies (ATOC) said. That's just great isn't it? This figure includes both commuter fares and other tickets where no restrictions are in place.

For the fares with no restrictions, the fares will go up much more, although no-one is willing to discuss just how much that will be. Operators can charge what they like for these tickets, and seeing as they don't really care what any of us plebs think, we'll probably find ourselves spitting feathers the next time we buy a ticket.

Commuters in the South East are looking at Southeastern hiking prices up to as much as 12.7 per cent on annual season tickets. So if you travel from Canterbury and London, a ticket that will have cost you £3,840 will probably rise by £488 to £4,328.

Gerry Doherty, general secretary of the Transport and Salaried Staffs Association, has slammed the move: "It is simply outrageous that hard pressed commuters are being forced to pay fare hikes of up to 10 per cent when they are themselves facing pay freezes and job cuts. Ministers claim this is to pay for a better railway. Passengers will regard that as a sick joke seeing as we have the most expensive and overcrowded railway in Europe."

So there you have it. Trains are about to become extinct. Well done to all concerned.

TOPICS:   Travel   Cool Stuff   Economy

11 comments

  • The B.
    I think the rail unions should all strike in protest and then demand a 7% pay rise in compensation.
  • Yue
    Expected that. This government is going to cripple us and make all of their freinds very, very rich by time they get kicked out.
  • Yue
    Incidentally since privatisation I've seen no improvements aside from the new trains, everything else is the same. If you think they can justify it look at Sweden and the price of a monthly travelcard for Stockholm, right out to the suburbs and compare the prices. We are all being bent over and no one seems to care.
  • David
    Since privatisation, trains are cleaner, more efficienct, reliable and even cheaper (in real terms). What's happened is they have become VERY popular and they are a victim of their own success. As an avid reader, I am disapoointed with the lack of foxes in this article.
  • The B.
    What has this government got to do with anything, the prices were going up at around 9% a year under Labour? Don't let your political leanings bias you though, eh?
  • anthony e.
    The government pay more in subsidies to the private rail companies now than when british rail were around,bring the railways back to the people.Nothing has changed on the railways except share holders are making money.
  • plop
    More efficient, David? Private Eye had an article a few months back about train companies fiddling their stats to appear more efficient, when in fact their performance was poorer than the old British Rail.
  • Hnnnrg
    Er, glasshouses..? You are, of course, writing as a member of the company that owns Quidco, who themselves are infamous for terrible customer service, as well as generally ripping people off.
  • Yue
    @Real Bob about 2 weeks ago the new government lifted the cap on rail pricing that was previously linked to retail price index +1% as the maximum increase possible. It's foreseen that prices will rise by 40% over the next 4 years. Take a look at what's happening right now, in an effort to 'fix' the economy, which incidentally during a worldwide recession rose 1% under the last administration, a lot of sneaky privatisation is going on. For example; schools will be federated by these new companies that have just appeared as the new Academies pop up (not the old academy status, just using the same name for a different purpose) away from local authorities, shareholders (again) will be reaping the rewards with money that should be spent on securing our future by educating rather than pumping grades to look like the job is being done. You think we're in trouble now with the recession? If there isn't an election in the next year we're looking at a depression, mass unemployment and those you seem to be defending will be laughing their arses off at you as their 4 year plan (the deadline they have for everything they've done since getting in) as they know that is the only window of opportunity they'll have to secure enough wealth to get by anything. I hope and wish I were wrong. While I'm ranting also look at their promises already broken, the private sector will save us and we're capping immigration. Private sector doesn't want to pay minimum wage to nationals and demand immigration caps are lifted and the Tories say alright then and lift the caps. Don't be blind, I may seem bias and would love to be wrong but we're heading for a shit heap of pain. Good luck to you.
  • Boris
    I am going to reduce the prices on the underground next year by 25% and reduce travel times by the same percentage. I've got my hands on some giant 'squeezie' technology that's going to push the stations 30% closer together than they are now. Amazing stuff - you should see it work. Somthing about removing wasted space from the atoms by altering the fine structure constant or similar guff.
  • Fare’s B.
    [...] days ago, the Association of Train Operating Companies (ATOC) announced train fares would be rising by over six per cent and by as much as thirteen per cent in the new year. Boo and hiss, cried pretty much everyone at the price hikes, which are set by the [...]

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