The trains are going to get better, according to Network Rail

31 March 2014

train Long suffering train passengers, good news! Network Rail have announced a 5 year investment plan which means you'll get more trains, more seats, less congestion and bigger, nicer train stations. What do you mean you'll believe it when you see it?

Network Rail will be spending a whopping £38bn on rail infrastructure, which also includes new tracks and an upgrade of existing lines. How they'll manage to keep our trains on time while doing track work is another matter.

Obviously, this hasn't come about out of the goodness of anyone's heart. Network Rail are looking at a £70m fine for delays over the past few years.

In a statement, chief exec of Network Rail, Mark Carne, said: "Passenger numbers in recent years have grown far beyond even our own industry's predictions, so it's vital that this investment over the next five years helps meet the continuing increase in demand for rail travel."

"Bigger, better stations, more tracks and longer platforms, electric-powered trains, reopened railway lines and fewer level crossings - all will help deliver more frequent, more comfortable, more reliable journeys and a safer, better-value railway for everyone."

The plans show that there will be (up to) 700 more trains a day between major northern cities, a 20% increase in the capacity of London's commuter trains, electrifying 850 miles of track, an east-west project which will connect Oxford and Milton Keynes and a facelift for Birmingham New Street and Manchester Victoria. £13bn has been put aside to sort out old tracks, points, platforms and fencing.

Carne also noted that Network Rail will be making provisions to make sure our trains can cope with extreme weather: "Over the next five years we will work tirelessly to improve the resilience of our railway, targeting investment in areas we know are vulnerable to nature's impact and reducing the likelihood of damage and disruption."

TOPICS:   Travel

What do you think?

Connect with Facebook, Twitter, or just enter your email to sign in and comment.

Your comment