Rail chiefs have 'lost grip' on projects

20 November 2015

train Rail bosses are being chided this week, as MPs say that they've 'lost their grip' on the various projects on the network. They're causing delays, overspending and generally, everyone's worse off as a result, thanks to their actions.

Public Accounts Committee (PAC) chair Meg Hillier said: "Network Rail has lost its grip on managing large infrastructure projects. The result is a two-fold blow to taxpayers: delays in the delivery of promised improvements, and a vastly bigger bill for delivering them."

The PAC report has raised grave concerns about rail investment in the UK, and they want a review of the industry's regulator. One thing that got their dander up, was the spiralling costs of the electrification of the Great Western railway line between London and South Wales. Initially, that was going to cost £1.6bn, but in 12 months, it has increased to £2.8bn. The report referred to this as "staggering and unacceptable".

The report also said that there's "far too much uncertainty" over electrification of the Midland Mainline from Sheffield to Bedford, and the Manchester-York Transpennine line. Who would've ever predicted this would have happened, eh?

The committee have stated that the rail network's 2014-19 investment programme could never have been delivered within agreed budgets, and that the role of the Office of Rail and Road (ORR) is now being questioned, and that the Department for Transport should consider the regulators future.

Hiller continued: "It is alarming that in planning work intended to support these plans, its judgement should be so flawed. Our inquiry has found that the agreed work could never have been delivered within the agreed budget and time frame."

"Yet Network Rail, the Department for Transport and the regulator - the Office of Rail and Road - signed up to the plans anyway. Passengers and the public are paying a heavy price and we must question whether the ORR is fit for purpose."

TOPICS:   Travel

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