EU considers "one flight, one price" rules for budget airlines

13 May 2011

Bitterwallet - Ryanair new plane liveryHoly moly - could it be true? The Daily Mirror has reported the EU is considering reforms that could force airlines to advertise an up-front price for their seats, instead of one that is subsequently compounded by tax, fees and levys.

European Commission vice-­president Siim Kallas is said to be reviewing air passenger rights and introducing fairer industry practices, after demands by the chairman of the powerful EU transport committee, Brian Simpson:

“Passengers are being ripped off by a seemingly endless list of charges that airlines add to the prices they advertise.

"Airlines are making millions by forcing holidaymakers to pay one fee to use credit and debit cards, pay another amount for taxes and fuel surcharges."

It's claimed that Ryanair's introduction of a compensation levy sparked calls for changes to be made, although we'd suggest they took a look at Jet2's shoddy handling of flight bookings before laying all the blame at the door of Skymarshall O'Leary. Can a "one flight, one price" policy ever work?

TOPICS:   Travel   World News


  • Dick
    I am partly with Ryanair (and the others) here. I don't think it should be "one flight, one price". Extras should be allowed, for extra fees. I agree there should be a base rate for flights advertised which includes all taxes and other fees such as fuel surcharges, which cannot be avoided. However optional fees such as baggage and payment methods, food and drinks, early boarding should be allowed. If it is a fixed price with no extra fees allowed at all, then surely they will do minimum service as standard. So nobody will be allowed to check-in bags, since this costs extra for them to provide and they want to keep the price as low as possible. Alternativey, everyone has to pay the baggage fee, whether they want to take baggage or not. I guess another way of doing it would be to charge people cash to store a bag on the aircraft, with lockers like at swimming pools. If they are allowed to sell cups of tea and coffee, why can they not sell space? Charging for drinks is essentialy an extra fee if you want another service, so they should be allowed to charge extra for extras such as storing a bag. If you have to take the service, it should be included in the base price. If you can opt out of the service, then it should be allowed as an extra fee.
  • oliverreed
    This is bollocks 'made up' news, the EU never does anything useful.
  • Tom
    The only reason to add all these charges after the initial cost of the flight, is to make comparing airlines more difficult. What Ryanair and co want to avoid is a simple price comparison site for flights; like we have for car insurance. If Ryanair is really the cheapest, then they should just show us one up front price, they should have nothing to loose.
  • Olly
    I've said it before, I think the best approach would be to force airlines to have to advertise a "typical customer will pay" price alongside the headline grabbing price. So if they advertise £10.99 flights to Spain, directly underneath it should says "a typical customer will pay £72.49" - which should basically be the total income you'll make on that flight over the a set period of time (eg three months) divided by the number of passengers you expect to carry.

What do you think?

Connect with Facebook, Twitter, or just enter your email to sign in and comment.

Your comment