Automatic refunds for delayed trains

5 October 2015

traintrackTrain passengers will be automatically refunded if their train is delayed by (at least) half an hour, thanks to a new scheme called the Automatic Delay Repay (ADR). The service is being launched by Virgin Trains, but the government are looking at getting all the operators to use it.

So what's the score? If you buy an advance ticket through an operators website or app, you'll get money back if your train is sufficiently late. The money would be with you within three days, and you won't have to claim for it as it'll be automatic.

Journeys with multiple connections across different operators are not eligible under this new scheme, so if you want refunds, you'll have to do it the old fashioned way. You can see our guide to getting compensation for a train journey, here.

Virgin are giving themselves a kick in the pants about this, as they're the joint-second worst performing operator in England and Wales, with around 5% of their trains either late (by more than 30 minutes), cancelled or failing to make a scheduled stop in the past 12 months. As such, Virgin Trains think that they'll be paying out an extra £2.8m under the new scheme, which in part, will be thanks to people getting refunds who previously couldn't be bothered to do it as it all seems like a massive faff.

Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin says: "Virgin Trains are making the most of modern technology to improve the service customers get. Our plan is to make sure passengers across the country benefit from schemes like this and we are encouraging other operators to roll out similar schemes nationwide."

So, here's the things that will get you a refund for the trains:

- Delays of 30-59 mins will see you getting 50% of the cost of a single ticket or the relevant portion of a return ticket.

- Delays of 60-119 mins will see you getting 100% of the cost of a single ticket or the relevant portion of a return ticket.

- Delays of 120 mins or over will see you getting 100% of the cost of a single or both portions of a return ticket.

TOPICS:   Travel   How To Guides

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