Smarter than the average business card

5 February 2014

Business cards, like most of the people that use them, are distinctly lo-fi. They’re a relic from another era, when suits were polyester and depressed salesmen could smoke in the lobby of the Marriott while contemplating suicide.

Despite Linkedin, however, these little glorified scraps of paper are here to stay amongst the schmoozers and the losers of the business world. But a small crowdfunded start up called TouchBase has created a new kind of business card – with patterns of conducive ink embedded in them like a QR code – which can be read by your smart phone.

So the idea is, you just do the Masonic handshake, whip your new business buddy’s card across your phone screen, and it reads the contact details and saves them to your phone.

At the moment they’re only designed to work with iphones, but if you want to be on the cutting edge of business card technology, a $25 donation will get you 36 of the new cards. OK, so they’re a bit pricey, but the beauty of them is that you don’t have to GIVE THEM AWAY. Just scan them in, and close the deal.

Alternatively, you could just ask your new contact for his/her phone number and put it into your phone. Or sleep with them and steal their phone. You’re the boss.

TOPICS:   Technology   Mobile   Economy


  • VulvaRevolver
    You haven't done a very good job of explaining what's going on here and you haven't provided a link for anyone to get further information. I've been able to encode Vcard data into QR codes for years. Smartphones scan it and it saves a contact to your phone. How is this different? Is it working a bit like NFC tags instead? What a Mickey Mouse outfit Bitterwallet is.
  • Big L.
    With a name like 'touchbase', I hope it falls flat on its arse and dies a horrible death. Fucking crap overused management slang like that boils my piss :/
  • Tim W.
    I concur - this is a pretty shit article - HOLD TIGHT!
  • Trolley B.
    Shit like that trolley.
  • JonB
    Business cards are mandatory for doing business in the far east, so they are far from being "a relic from another era".

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