Sky switch porn filters on by default

21 December 2015

porn Sky are going to automatically block porn (or, if you prefer, 'adult content') from now on. They've pulled the massive lever, that will ensure all dirty stuff will be filtered out by default. The company have said that this is going to result in "much greater use of home filters", but customers can still opt-out if they like.

You'll now have to ring them up and say: "Why yes, I'd love to be watching mucky videos online, thank you very much."

Sky launched their thing that filtered out content - the Broadband Shield - back in 2013, but figures show that after a year of offering it to their customers, only 3% opted to. Earlier this year, Sky asked all their customers if they wanted to switch Broadband Shield on. If you ignored the email, it was automatically turned on.

Now, if you're a new customer, the company will automatically switch the Broadband Shield on. If this isn't your thing, make sure you tell them you don't want it.

This is all thanks to David Cameron, who wants all the broadband providers to put these blocks in place. He's clearly got some weird issues with people looking at dirty pictures on their computers and phones.

Other companies have been doing the same, with Ofcom saying that 6% of BT customers having parental controls, and around 12% of Virgin Media, and 14% of TalkTalk customers filtering their results.

TOPICS:   Technology

4 comments

  • Shopper
    "He’s clearly got some weird issues with people looking at dirty pictures on their computers and phones." Well, more accurately, the issue is children looking at porn.
  • tin
    even more accurately it's children with irresponsible/unaware parents looking at porn and then quite likely showing it to their mates, or just plain accidentally stumbling across porn which is really quite easy these days. Once your 6 year old sees an image of a lass getting drilled at both ends (just to pick an example ofc), you can't take that back out of their head. If a person would like to view adult content I think they should need to be adult enough to call and ask that they be able. A really small price to pay I think.
  • oldgit
    Filters work fine in principle and poorly in practice. They either stop legitimate content (what exactly is the definition of 'porn' that you apply as your filter) or allow so much 'banned' content through that it becomes ineffectual.
  • Uncle B.
    Or you can filter out all kinds of stuff directly in the router settings. However that would mean people having to learn how to do that. If parents were really concerned about this kind of thing they would learn how to do that from a simply google search or ask someone who knows how to set it up for them. Really no excuse for kids seeing this kind of thing considering the technol0gy out there.

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