How to keep your nudes safe from being hacked

1 September 2014

naked selfie As you're no doubt aware, Jennifer Lawrence has had some naked selfies stolen from her, and according to the very reputable 4chan, they were swiped by someone hacking her iCloud account. If you haven't seen the photos, then chances are we've lost you and you're burrowing into a search engine now, looking for boobs.

How can you keep your cloud accounts safe? If you have an account with iCloud, Dropbox or Google+, you might find that they automatically upload and save your images.

First thing to do is to make sure your password doesn't get stolen or is difficult to guess. That's blindingly obvious, but worth mentioning. Change your passwords regularly and make sure they're not words, but rather, a collection of letters, numbers and symbols.

It doesn't matter how safe cloud accounts are made if your password is 123456 or 'password'.

Another thing you can do is make sure that you switch off the automatic backup services. In all Apple devices, you can disable Photostream. If you turn it off, it'll delete any automatically stored images from iCloud. You'll have to delete any manually shared Photostreams yourself.

With Dropbox, your Android device can be set-up to upload every photo and video you take into the cloud. If that's not your thing, go to 'settings' and turn the option off. You'll also need to delete them from Dropbox manually.

On Android, G+ and Picasa, you can disable automatic photo backup in the Photos app on your device. You'll need to go to 'settings' then Auto-Backup and then untick 'Back up local folders'.

Of course, you're not a celebrity so the chances of someone wanting to hack your account and share your photos are slim. However, if you're feeling jumpy or just want to disable these functions, now you know how.

You're still not reading this are you. You're still looking at boobs.

TOPICS:   Technology   Privacy

1 comment

  • Name
    Why should I change my password regularly? If my password is lost, all my data will be stolen immediately. A better suggestion is to use a different (good) password on every service and store it in a password safe. That way, if one service is compromised, the others will not be.

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