Government aiming to ban WhatsApp and iMessage again

18 September 2015

david cameron government While the government are trying to stop people from undertaking Freedom of Information requests, so we can't look at their correspondence and dodgy deals, funnily enough, they're not so concerned about privacy when it comes to the public's messages.

MI5 boss Andrew Parker is asking the government to get new powers to monitor communications, which means that encrypted messaging services like WhatsApp and iMessage could be banned.

Of course, they're blaming terrorists again, and Parker has said internet companies have a "responsibility" to share information about their users, and that the use of strong encryption in apps should be illegal.

This backs David Cameron's views on the matter, where he said that he doesn't want to "allow a means of communication between people which we cannot read". Maybe, like the government's FOI idea, we should all charge the authorities £600-a-pop if they want to look in our messages. Sound fair?

Parker reckons that encryption is "creating a situation where law enforcement agencies and security agencies can no longer obtain under proper legal warrant the contents of communications between people they have reason to believe are terrorists".

"They are using secure apps and internet communication to try to broadcast their message and incite and direct terrorism amongst people who live here who are prepared to listen to their message." He added that it "is in nobody's interests that terrorists should be able to plot and communicate out of the reach of any authorities with proper legal power".

Just imagine, if we can't have encrypted messages, what baddies might be able to do, if they can hack into everyone's messages too! Of course, Apple and Facebook (who own iMessage and WhatsApp respectively) are keen to commit to their users privacy (apart from all the times they use your details to make cash and the like).

Anyway, keep an eye out for the Home Secretary bringing back the Snooper's Charter, as your privacy isn't too much of a concern to the current government.

TOPICS:   Technology   Privacy   Government

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