Google nix homophobic games and trolls

25 November 2014

asshunter Google have got rid of a game that required the gamer to kill gay people. Which is nice.

Ass Hunter had already been downloaded over 10,000 times and had 200 five star reviews, but was eventually pulled by Google after some people online went "Yeah, that's a bit iffy".

Basically you play a hunter with a shotgun - such a good look - and you must kill naked men before they approach you. Nice! If you fail to kill the naked men, they pounce upon the hunter and bum him. Enlightening.

In the description of the app, its uploaders AppDay - who sound like charmers - described Ass Hunter as a “Legendary game, where you are hunter and your mission is to kill gays as much as you can”.

When the game went up on November 5th, the description read “Popular game hunting on gays is now on Android! Play and do not be gay!" (Seriously. Someone has received money for coming up with that tagline). Making homophobia justifiable with such taglines as “Remember! When they catch you they will do with you whatever they want.” the game was also exempt from classification so anyone could download it.

Well done everyone. Genuinely, give yourselves a round of applause. Anyway, it's gone now, but if you're desperate there are versions of it lying around the internet.

In addition to that, Google have gone after trolls. Not particularly willingly, mind you. The internet giant lost a legal battle with a man who took them to court for extreme trolling.

Daniel Hegglin, a former Morgan Stanley banker, had took action in an attempt to block links to the "vile and abusive" posts about him from appearing in its search results. He'd been accused of being a murderer, paedophile and Ku Klux Klan sympathiser by one particular troll who we could surmise 'had some form of grudge', with posts saying as such on over 3,600 websites. That's literally 'a bit too many'.

Hegglin settled the case with Google yesterday, despite Google's lawyers suggesting that the case could have enormous implications., with the search engine basically being held up as the internet police.

Hugh Tomlinson QC, acting for Mr Hegglin, told the court that Google had taken steps to remove the material: "Whilst I am not in a position to disclose the details, I am pleased to report that the parties have now settled the matter," he said. "The settlement includes significant efforts on Google's part to remove the abusive material from Google hosted websites and from its search results."

Now Hegglin plans to bring the troll to justice, however he doesn't know who they are. Oooh - this is slightly worrying now: "Google provides search services to millions of people and cannot be responsible for policing internet content. It will, however, continue to apply its procedures that have been developed to assist with the removal of content which breaches applicable local laws."

A Google spokesperson said the company had "reached a mutually acceptable agreement". Now: why can't everyone just play nicely?

TOPICS:   Technology

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