Google lose appeal and are going to get sued over privacy concerns

27 March 2015

google Google have lost their Court of Appeal bid to prevent British consumers having the right to sue them in the UK.

Pardon? Well, a group called Safari Users Against Google's Secret Tracking (which has the frankly rubbish aconym of SUAGST) want to sue the internet behemoth in the English courts over what they claim are Google bypassing security settings to track them online.

Three appeal judges have dismissed Google's appeal against a High Court ruling and ruled that claims for damages can be brought over the allegations of Google's misuse of private information.

The Safari Users say that Google's "clandestine" tracking and collation of internet usage (between the summer of 2011 and early 2012) led to distress and embarrassment among UK users. You might not remember that, because as a BW reader, you're in a constant state of embarrassment and distress, so all the years roll into one.

Anyway, the group say that Google collected private info through cookies, without their information.

Dan Tench, a partner at law firm Olswang, who are representing the group, said this case decides "whether British consumers actually have any right to hold Google to account in this country". Tench added: "This is the appropriate forum for this case - here in England where the consumers used the internet and where they have a right to privacy."

Lord Dyson, Master of the Rolls, and Lady Justice Sharp said in their joint judgement, with which Lord Justice McFarlane agreed: "On the face of it, these claims raise serious issues which merit a trial. They concern what is alleged to have been the secret and blanket tracking and collation of information, often of an extremely private nature... about and associated with with the claimants' internet use, and the subsequent use of that information for about nine months."

"The case relates to the anxiety and distress this intrusion upon autonomy has caused."

TOPICS:   Technology   Privacy

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