Google launch music streaming service (but might be spying on you)

24 June 2015

google Google art taking shots at Apple by launching a free version of its music streaming service Play Music. Of course, Google Play Music as a subscription service is already a thing, but the internet behemoth has decided to take on Apple's music service (and of course, Spotify's).

This free version is going to be made up of curated playlists, which have been designed for different times of the day, which sounds a bit rubbish. Initially, this service is only available in the States and will have adverts like Spotify's freemium service.

With Apple set to launch their music service on 30th June, they're no doubt going to be annoyed by this.

In a blog post, Google product manager Elias Roman said: "Even if you're not already a Google Play Music subscriber, we've got you covered. Google Play Music now has a free, ad-supported version in the US, giving you a new way to find just the right music - and giving artists another way to earn revenue."

"The new free, ad-supported version of Google Play Music is launching first in the US. It's available on the web today, and is rolling out this week to Android and iOS."

However, this won't cover up the fact that a load of people are losing their baps about Google spying on everyone. Open-source developers noticed that Chromium (that's the open-source version of Chrome) had been installing audio-snooping code that was capable of listening to users.

Now, this code has been put in, so that people can talk to their computers via OK Google thingummy, which is all well and good, but the kicker here, is that the listening technology was activated without anyone's permission. That, obviously, isn't cricket.

"Without consent, Google's code had downloaded a black box of code that - according to itself -  had turned on the microphone and was actively listening to your room", said Rick Falkvinge, the Pirate party founder. "Which means that your computer had been stealth configured to send what was being said in your room to somebody else, to a private company in another country, without your consent or knowledge, an audio transmission triggered by... an unknown and unverifiable set of conditions".

Google say that this isn't activated "unless you opt in to hotwording", but developers aren't having that. Developer Ofer Zelig says: "While I was working I thought 'I’m noticing that an LED goes on and off, on the corner of my eyesight [webcam]'. And after a few times when it just seemed weird, I sat to watch for it and saw it happening. Every few seconds or so".

So there you go - you can have free music, but Google might end up listening to you caterwauling along to it as well.

TOPICS:   Technology   Privacy

What do you think?

Connect with Facebook, Twitter, or just enter your email to sign in and comment.

Your comment