Google: Contact lens cameras and still looking at your emails

15 April 2014

google-plus-logo Google, as we all know, aren't too fussed about your privacy. When they're not teaming up with governments, they're scanning your correspondence so they can target adverts at you.

Personal privacy groups have long been unhappy with the internet giant and even Microsoft got in on the action, shouting "Don't Get Scroogled by Gmail" when they were trying to convince everyone to use Outlook.

One court case against Google's sniffing around our emails, District Judge Lucy H. Koh said that Google's terms of service and privacy polices did not explicitly notify the plaintiffs "that Google would intercept users' emails for the purposes of creating user profiles or providing targeted advertising."

After that was said, Google spontaneously decided to update their terms of service, which came into play as of Monday, adding the provision that "Our automated systems analyse your content (including emails) to provide you personally relevant product features, such as customized search results, tailored advertising, and spam and malware detection. This analysis occurs as the content is sent, received, and when it is stored."

Not only that, but it looks like they've got some more wearable tech in the pipeline which could well creep out the kind of people who think the sky is falling on their heads.

Basically, those worried about Google Glass taking photos without consent will love the news that Google now has a pending patent for a contact lens embedded with a camera. That's Google Glass which you wouldn't be able to see if someone was wearing it. That's human beings, essentially walking around with a camera stuck on their eyeball. It'll be ace of paparazzi photographers.

Google say that the development would be used or diabetics and blind people, which is a nice idea; but if Glass takes off, you can't see a scenario where Google wouldn't want to try and make a shedload of money from it with a general sale.

TOPICS:   Technology   Privacy

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