Do you want to store online adverts and look at them later? Of course not.

29 June 2011

snake-oil-cables

The worst thing about navigating the online portal is stupid adverts. They roll-over, shout, sing, dance and generally distract you from whatever it you're trying to do. Some are so infuriating that you end up putting your size 9s straight through your monitor just to escape the hellishness of it all.

So what would you say to a complete lack of commercials online? That'd be great wouldn't it?

Well, some bright spark has come up with something called AdKeeper. Basically, the thinking behind it is that you'll end up saving your favourite commercials and watch them when it is more convenient to you.

Commercials will be stored in a central location and you can watch them at leisure without all that pesky content getting in the way. Participating advertisers will place a small button on ads with the AdKeeper logo — a “K” formed by an exclamation point and less-than symbol — and when a consumer clicks the button, the ad is stored on your page on AdKeeper.com.

Or, if you're smart, you'll send every single advert to this 'location' and never, ever log-in to it, leaving you completely ad-free.

Scott P. Kurnit, chief exec of AdKeeper, says: “The question rational people have is, ‘Hey, don’t people dislike ads — why would people keep ads and why would they go back and look at what they’ve kept?’ It’s time-shifted advertising” and "truly invitational".

Now, seeing as (according to Google) the average click-through rate for online ads is 0.1 percent, it is difficult to imagine that anyone would actually want to sift through a bunch of saved commercials. Still, if companies sign up for it, this could be a great way of hoarding all those commercials away with a simple click of a button, never to be seen again.

Hardly the intention of the program, but who cares about those guys?

TOPICS:   Technology   Advertising

8 comments

  • Alex
    Or you could just use adblock with firefox and never have to worry about ads.
  • Andrew R.
    Second Alex's point - this is no doubt a fucking silly VC-backed business that will fall on its arse when no-one uses it.
  • Minty F.
    .1% How many of those are accidental clicks I wonder. i just wonder what sort of disconnection from reality these advertising chaps seem to foster, after all they seem to actually think that other humans want to see adverts. And the simple fact that people don't seem to be clicking on the ads is nothing to do with a persons lack of desire for the product or a wish to not click on another godawful advertisment, no the problem is that its just not large or annoying enough. But then I just finished reading Neil Stephensons 'An illustrated primer', and there are a few nasty advertising concepts there. So I could be a bit weirded out about ad hacking eyeballs, and 3d disruptive billboards. Advertisers would do it if they could get away with it for sure.
  • StauntonLick
    Watch the video about NUAds on Kinect and you'll get an idea of the weird reality that advertisers occupy, and how little it has in common with reality. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSk5DhxQHLo +1 for Adblock by the way. Although given recent developments with trade groups lobbying parliament to prioritize sites based on what they can pay I suspect it won't be too long before advertisers lobby to make software like Adblock illegal so we all have to sit and watch their crappy ads.
  • Jeebus
    The more invasive or fucking annoying an ad is the less likely I am to purchase the said product. With such a poor click through rate (I agree with Minty, many are probably accidental anyway) it makes you wonder why they bother. If I'm on a less than respectable site which is occupying my attention why the heck would I be interested in party poker, etc.
  • Will
    Don't you think .1% is surprisingly high? How often do you click adverts? Never? How many people use adblock software and don't even see ads? A small but significant percentage? Really, at .1%, for every million clicks (this is the WORLD wide web after all) 1000 people click through to an ad, despite a lot of people's best intentions to ignore. Scale that up to a whole year: are we talking billions of clicks? .1% doesn't seem tiny now really. So yes, there may be a market for it. And when it comes to advertising and marketing, chances are there probably always will be.
  • axisofevil
    I'll click-thru (read click-through) on a Website if it's providing a free service or is a charity etc... Doesn't mean I'll part with cash though.
  • Dick
    If I've got nothing better to do (which is most of the time), I do random searches and click through google ads. It's nice to know I am spending someone's advertising budget.

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