Deathwatch: Is HTC going down the pan?

9 October 2012

deathwatch Heralded as some kind of iPhone killer, the HTC Desire came out to a rapturous welcome before everyone realised it had an awful battery life and about as much memory storage as a Commodore 16. Since then, other phones have, basically, been much better and many have now decided to walk away from HTC because their flagship phone didn't cut it.

This is showing in the Taiwanese company's balance sheet as they saw a gigantic 79% drop in Q3 net profits. This is in sharp contrast to Samsung who is currently skipping around with glee at the news that they have made a record £4.5bn in profit in the same period (which is almost double last year's takings).


Already, HTC has started to "streamline operations" and axing certain wings of the business. Gartner’s Carolina Milanesi isn't optimistic, saying: "HTC continues to struggle to differentiate its offering within the Android ecosystem. Despite the rollout of the HTC One and the fact that the device comes highly rated by bloggers and industry watchers, sales remained limited. HTC needs to focus on growing its brand value in the eyes of consumers so as to fence off competition."

Could we be witnessing the death of HTC already, so soon after it came onto the British market?

TOPICS:   Technology   Mobile   High Street News


  • Michael J.
    Crap customer service, and incredibly irritating with their whole 'release 3 slightly different handsets at once' mantra. Outperformed by Samsung on Android, and soon to be crushed by Nokia on WP8. They've become a bit second-rate after the Desire.
  • OlPeculier
    Only just entered the UK market? I had a Orange HTC SVP ten years ago, could even play Quake on it!
  • jah128
    HTC Desire is from March 2010, its competitor was the iPhone 3GS. It had more than double the RAM, 6hrs more standby battery life and 10% more 3G talktime. How does it have any relevance at all to the companies 79% 2011-2012 Q3 profit drops?
  • Colin
    Another shit article by a shit reporter
  • Tomhlord
    Hardly fair comment in this article. The HTC OneX (and now with the One XV & OneX+) is regarded as clearly one of the flagship phones on the market. They have always offered more spec for less money over the equivalent iPhone. The product is not in doubt. The confusing model lineup and weak marketing are not so easy to ignore. They will still be around for a long time yet, those figures aren't great but still way way above Nokia & Blackberry.....
  • 64kDroid
    To say HTC are new to the British market is complete nonsense, they were selling handsets over here years before the first iPhone was released.
  • Neil
    Dumb article obviously written by a jealous iPhone owner. HTC will be around for a long time yet and their HTC sense version of Android is superior to Samsung's. I'm looking forward to the one X+ coming out this month.
  • Trollateriat
    Cold. Not an iPhone. Shit - this isn't HUKD. Where am I?
  • Lemax
    The One X is kind of nice looking, but why would your average Joe want one instead on the corresponding Apple or Samsung product (pointless Android/Apple fanboy lunacy aside)? It's like buying a Mazda - Makes lot of sense on paper, but you just wouldn't. Think back to the initial reports about RIM being in trouble; a couple of dodgy quarterly earning reports quickly lead to real trouble.
  • JeffLange
    Well they are cheap phones but the worst part is they have that buggy and slow android on them. Feed up having to reset them by pulling the battery and having to watch for dodgy downloads on the store. And don't get me started about how long it takes to sort anything out as its not as quick or intuitive as other operating systems.
  • Ric B.
    @Jeff Lame trolling mate! This isn't 2010 anymore and Android has grown up well beyond your clearly beloved iOS! Clearly your ears are deaf to the slagging off iOS 6 has received...... That said the reason the One X failed to sell over the S3 will have been down to the battery and the fact you can't remove it unlike the S3's HTC need to focus on Customer service and up their game in handset design by giving customers what they want instead of reasons not to buy! Oh and as for the reporting, there was sod all wrong with the design of the Desire and it's architecture, the lack of memory was sorted within a few key presses and for most people it was Facebook's crappy app that was causing it by constantly filling up its cache and not purging old data. Hardly HTC's fault for that was it?
  • Sicknote
    Can't help but think that Samsung are the new world leaders and everyone else will start to slide
  • Steve
    I hope not! I've had HTC phones for over 3 years now and they have all been brilliant! Yes - battery life could be better but the devices themselves are superb - and I'd rather a HTC One X to the S3!
  • Louise
    I went from an HTC Desire HD to a Samsung S3 and I still prefer HTC Sense; kinda missing some aspects of it with my new(ish) phone. The biggest reason I didn't bother with the One X was the lack of expendable memory. And HTC's customer service was brilliant when my Desire HD went funny near the end of the two year guarantee period. My opinion, anyway.
  • Craig
    Who cares, My nokia 5800 Music's still going strong.
  • Widlof
    I tend to stick to a manufacturer I know and trust. Used to be Nokia till reliability went right out of the window. I've used HTC now for five years and never looked back. 100% reliable unlike work colleagues with their various generations of iPhones locking up repeatedly. I hope HTC's fortunes improve as deserved.
  • b0redj0rd
    I had a HD2, running windows 'til I discovered custom android ROMs. After lots of messing around (loved the phone) it broke (CPU) - I managed to get an original windows rom back on the phone and sent it back to HTC, they gave me a brand new Desire HD for free so they have great customer service as far as I'm concerned. I now have a One X - I know others who have it who don't like it or have had issues with wifi, but I haven't and mine is going strong.

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