Amazon look at selfies for payment

15 March 2016

Mastercard have been looking at selfies as a form of ID, and so too over at Google.

Well, Amazon are also looking into it too, filing for a patent application which will allow you to make transactions with your face. The internet giant think that this is going to improve your security, unless of course, you have worries about Amazon storing images of your face.

Their patent looks like this.


The patent says: "While many conventional approaches rely on password entry for user authentication, these passwords can be stolen or discovered by other persons who can impersonate the user for any of a variety of tasks."

"Further, the entry of these passwords on portable devices is not user friendly in many cases, as the small touchscreen or keyboard elements can be difficult to accurately select using a relatively large human finger, and can require the user to turn away from friends or co-workers when entering a password, which can be awkward or embarrassing in many situations."

We're not sure passwords are 'embarrassing' or likely to create an awkward situation in 2016, but there you go.

Either way, it looks like all the tech companies are going to want to move away from the regular password option, and start looking at other options.

Amazon think that their "selfie pay" service will be better and safer than facial recognition software, because this "can often be spoofed by holding a picture of the user in front of the camera, as the resulting two-dimensional image can look substantially the same whether taken of the user or a picture of the user".

So, with this technology, you'd have to take a photo of yourself, and then take another one that confirms "the person contained in the first image corresponds to a physical being in proximity of the computing device". This will apparently include, according to the patent application, people blinking, smiling, or tilting their head.

TOPICS:   Technology   Banking   Social Media

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