Coalition's tax and benefit changes cost us all £489 a year

23 January 2015

tax Although it’s only January, all the political parties are upping their efforts with a view on the general election in a few short months’ time. Of course, part of the election campaign is to impress upon the electorate how much better any given party is than all the others, so what the coalition needs like a hole in the head is a national thinktank providing economic evidence of how much worse off the average UK household is as a result of the coalition’s changes to taxes and benefits. According to the Institute for Fiscal Studies, it’s a fairly sizeable £489 a year.

Of course, that is an average figure, and depending on your personal circumstances, you may have lost more than this, or ended up better off. However, the IFS has also identified broad groups who are likely to have been winners or losers under the coalition regime.

It may come as a surprise to a few, but low-income working-age households have been hit hardest, losing the most under the coalition as a percentage of their income. Also losing out are families with children, who fall within the lowest 10% of earners, who lost £1,223 on average. However, the richest 10% of households also lost £5,350 a year.

So where are the Tories and Lib Dems going to get their votes from? Middle and higher-income households of working age have escaped "remarkably unscathed" from the government's austerity measures. Those falling into this bracket who don't own children have actually gained financially from the changes, largely due to increases in the threshold for paying income tax, according to the IFS.

Overall, the poorest households lost around 4% of their incomes, followed closely behind by the next poorest tenth, losing around 3.5% of their income. The richest suffered a loss of 2.5%, a percentage that falls to zero for middle-income households.

Pensioners were "relatively unaffected" on average, as the "triple lock" on the state pension, whichmeant they have been relatively better protected against the economic downturn than those employed, was largely offset by a hike in VAT.

The hardest-hit region was greater London, where households lost an average £1,042, followed by south east England, the West Midlands and north west England.

James Browne, a senior research economist at IFS and co-author of the report said: "Whichever way you cut it, low-income households with children and the very richest households have lost out significantly from the changes as a percentage of their incomes.

"Increases in the tax-free personal allowance have played an important role in protecting middle-income working-age households meaning that those without children have actually gained overall."

TOPICS:   Tax   Government   Economy

1 comment

  • kronas
    well for a long time the rules have been anti couple so this cements my theory having children is financially penalizing for the people who work... what a daft country we live.....

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