Sainsbury's to pay store staff more than the living wage

27 August 2015

sainsburys Sainsbury’s might be having a tough time with the balance sheet of late, but that doesn't mean they can't treat their staff right. They've vowed to pay its 137,000 store staff more than the Chancellor’s compulsory national living wage.

The supermarket's 4% pay rise is the highest spike in wages for store staff that they've given out in a decade.

Boss Mike Coupe says he's “committed to rewarding great service” and that they'll be awarding its colleagues an “industry-leading” 4% pay rise, taking their standard rate of pay from £7.08 to £7.36 per hour.

George Osborne's living wage is £7.20, and comes into play in April 2016.

Sainsbury’s say that this pay rise will be kicking off from Sunday and applies to staff of all ages, while the government's living wage is only applicable to those over 25. Sainsbury's added that they'll continue to provide staff with paid breaks which are taken during shifts. Not bad eh? Beers are on any Saino's staff you know.

Mike Coupe said that this raise was a reward for employees' “hard work, talent and dedication.” adding: "We’re delighted to announce a 4% pay increase for the colleagues who work in our stores across the country. We know what a difference they make to our customers each and every day and we’re totally committed to rewarding them well for the great service they provide."

"I’ve talked to thousands of colleagues over the past year and they tell me how much they value their package of benefits and the flexibility that we can offer as an employer, as well as hourly pay, which has always been well over the minimum wage."

"Their hard work, talent and dedication have been central to our success and will remain so in the future."

TOPICS:   Supermarket

1 comment

  • Olly B.
    I wouldn't go overboard with the champagne there. Sainsbury's is still paying it's staff significantly under the Living Wage set by the Living Wage Foundation (currently £7.85 p/h outside London). That takes into consideration the actual cost of living, as opposed to the rebranded minimum wage, which is based on a median earnings (eg absolutely no connection to the cost of living, somewhat making a mockery of the title). The Government's "Living Wage" may be higher that the old minimum wage, but that doesn't take into account the reduction in benefits and tax credits and increase in other taxes and duties that can affect the actual money someone needs to live a reasonable life. Ikea recently became the first major retailer to sign up to the Living Wage; Sainsbury's should only be celebrated when they join them. Not because they are paying 16p more than the legal minimum they are allowed to. Details here:

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