Look out! There's more phone fraud knocking about!

29 October 2014

telesales telephone Time to get vigilant, dear Bitterwallet reader, because there's a scam doing the rounds that tricks you into believing you're talking to a trusted business on the phone.

We wouldn't be doing our civic duty if we didn't inform you of it, but if you're one of those lazy people who can't be bothered reading an article, then the solution we offer is to never, ever answer a phone call, just to be on the safe side.

For those who insist on answering phonecalls or, indeed, want to learn about doing some fraud for some extra beer money, here's the low down.

This scam has been dubbed 'number spoofing', where ne'er-do-wells clone a telephone number of an organisation and basically impersonate them so that, on your caller ID, you'll think it is all legit and above board. The people at Financial Fraud Action UK reckon that this has become a bit of a problem in recent weeks.

Of course, this type of scam has been knocking around for years, but it is on the increase and criminals are using it to steal your money. At the moment, according to FFA UK, the main targets are businesses, but personal banking customers are also finding themselves being contacted by these snide gits.

Basically, fraudsters are posing as bank staff or police officers and ask you for your personal and financial details. They usually tell you that fraudulent activity has been detected on your account, which is a bit rich seeing as the scam ends up with fraudulent activity all up in your business.

If the scam artists don't get your details, they'll try and get you to send money to another account for 'safe-keeping'. Frankly, if you're going to fall for that, then you need to start worrying. Remember though - no organisation, including your bank, will ever, ever ask for your password and PIN number in whole. Anyone doing so is absolutely trying it on with you.

Craig Jones, spokesperson for FFA UK, said: "Number spoofing is becoming increasingly common and it's not difficult for the criminals to fake a caller ID. So if a number appears on your phone's caller ID display, you shouldn't assume you know where the call is being made from."

"Remember that if a caller is trying to draw your attention to the number on your phone display, it's very unlikely the call is genuine as there is no legitimate reason to point it out."

TOPICS:   Scams

1 comment

  • Fat H.
    I've seen local numbers come up on my caller display from companies that aren't even based in my local area. A friend of mine who is being chased every half hour for defaulting on his credit card even has the card company ringing from a local number. Spoofing is not just reserved for the criminals. Then again his high-interest credit card supplier probably falls into that category anyway.

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