The postman loses his bike and gets something more rubbish

9 September 2010

postman and his bikeThe postal service will be getting rid of the famous Pashley Mailstar bikes that we've seen our postmen tootling around on, in favour of something more modern.

Everyone, apart from a fair number of postmen and women, agrees. Even the union have shown uncharacteristic support for the move.

The postie's union, the CWU says: "For every postman and woman who loves their bicycle, there's one that hates them. We fully support the changes for improved efficiency, safety and environmental performance. Most important is the modernisation of the industry.

Cycling campaigners, CTC have been kicking up a stink, but the union aren't having any of it.

A spokesperson said: "Today's protest by CTC used ancient cycles and old postal uniforms. We're fighting for a modern Royal Mail. You have to let go of some of the sentimentality surrounding traditional views of an industry spanning hundreds of years if you want to have a successful future."

This all seems to revolve around the fact that 13 cycle delivery postmen and women had been killed at work over the past 15 years, with countless more injured in road traffic accidents.

So what are they getting in place of the bikes? Well, a couple of electronic trolleys, one you ride like a crap go-kart is being weighed up. Perhaps the Royal Mail should look at how many pensioners get injured by slowly creeping along the road in their mobility scooters or, indeed, look at how many people they crash into on the pavements.

One thing's for sure, the two trolleys that are being decided on will certainly do one thing - it will make all people who post our letters and packages look like complete dicks.

22 comments

  • Whisky
    I just want my post to arrive before I get home from work, and more then 2 deliveries a week would be nice. I dont care how they do it. I live in a town of circa 40,000 people btw not out in the sticks where I suspect the post service is much better.
  • Mark C.
    Aren't companies supposed to be getting more people exercising and on bikes, rather than just sitting on their arses all day? And I'm curious how 13 deaths in a decade and a half compares to the death and injury statistics throughout the Royal Mail (which is a pretty vast organisation) during that period.
  • Noghar
    Where did i read that rant from a postie about how useless the RM trolleys are? With their fixed slow speed and their startling inabiity to cope with hazards like, em, stairs.
  • Marky M.
    Yes, I'm having difficulty letting go of some of the sentimentality surrounding traditional views of service which could deliver a letter to Aberdeen less than one day after it had been posted in Aylesbury, for a few pence and in one piece.
  • Fat P.
    Its a joke. I'm embaressed to be a postman. In an age of being environmentally conscious, we are ditching bikes, which are great, to having 2 postmen to a little van. So we are putting thousands of vans on the road, and delivering the post later and later in the day. You know what postmen actually want? To be able to get in early, deliver nice and early, have simple, efficient methods of getting the mail around, and we have a management structure full of people with no idea how the job is actually done. Sorry, that probably makes little sense, but we just want to be able to do our job properly, and we get crapped on at every turn.
  • hippy1001
    cant say ive seen a postperson (cos women do it too ya know!) on a bike. those things look stupid anyway, should get them pimped out choppers instead of ditching them for another car on the road. /me keeps an eye on fleabay for old postie bikes up for sale
  • The B.
    Whisky, I've a feeling it depends on your postie, mine turns up around 11am rain or shine, we know when he's on holiday as we'll get one delivery of 20 letters a week at 4 in the afternoon.
  • Whisky
    Bob, I have long suspectd we do not have an assigned postie and our street simply gets added on to whoever has the least letters that day. Fat Postman, you say almost the same thing as my father-in-law who has been in the post service for 30 odd years albeit in the sorting office. Seems the Royal Mail have some real problems with poorly advised middle managers.
  • Brian's U.
    My postie is brilliant. Frank is his name.
  • Coleslaw
    Get them all Raleigh Choppers.
  • Young P.
    Fat Postman: I completly agree. Whisky: You're not far off. I've been a postman for about 6 years and in that little time its gone from a great job to a shitty one. Myself and every single postman in my office wouild love to return to the structure of getting in early and getting out early. I used to start delivering at 7 on the dot (the earliest by law that you can russle letterboxes and knock on doors. Now my duty description says delivery starts at 10.15. Every person in my office thinks this is a joke and we all skip our breaks and lunch to be out earlier. Royal mail see this as an opportunity for them to pile more work on. Ive just completed a part time degree which I've done in the evenings (testing when you get up at half four six days a week) and i'm so looking forward to GETTING THE FUCK OUT OF THIS JOB!
  • Whisky
    Young Postie, Thats interesting, I wasn't aware you were not allowed (advised) to start delivering until 10.15, more interesting is I assume they still make you arrive for the old time (hence getting up at half 4) what on earth do they have you doing until 10.15?
  • Coleslaw
    While we are here, whoever delivers to my house. Please stop fucking dropping the red elastic bands on my doorstep. Kind Regards.
  • -]
    Whisky, posties have to sort their own mail before they start delivering. It isn't a case of turning up, picking up your bags and delivering. You've got a shift before you even get out doing the donkey work.
  • Fat P.
    We spend more and more time sorting the mail into areas, then rounds, then into the right order - we do 50% or more of our daily work out of the sight of the public. Delivering the mail is the final part of our working day. Our bosses have told us that they've surveyed the public and they dont mind when they get their mail. Thats news to us postmen.
  • Priligy k.
    i just want to say blablabla
  • Paula
    I have listened to many a postmens/womens view over the last say 4 years. In order to run a business successfully you need to get an equal balance, you need employee input, customer input (and not just SOME areas), and environmental and legal input. The MANAGEMENT must then decide on a system that will respect all parties. With this current Royal Mail management this is NOT happening and it SHOULD be considering their salaries compared to those delivering the goods. I would like to get EVERYONE to STOP buying R Mail stamps and using their parcel service for one month to show this so called MANAGEMENT that MOST of the public want to see the business given PROPER consideration (If every household put £1 in a kitty to support the postpersons wages for that month it would help). The service will NOT work if the postpersons are not happy, it will continue to go downhill. The above comments of other members of the public and R Mail employees are WELL WORTH considering. ITS ABOUT TIME THE PUBLIC SHOWED SOME ACTION !
  • Leigh H.
    It never ceases to amaze me why management simply cannot provide the postal workers with a choice of how to execute their deliveries. Use a bike if you wish or use a trolley if you prefer. If not, use a van or something similar. Provided the individual is happy and given a real choice - then in reality all that starts well should end well. I have been a postman for nearly ten years and although the job is nowhere near as gratifying as it used to be (P.S. early starting and finishing times) it is becoming increasingly apparent that management want all postmen/women under tighter control whilst implementing their respective duties. There definitely seems to be a control issue that factors into the equation from their standpoint. All too often in my view - unions and management combined - hide behind words like 'modernisation', 'change' and 'moving forward' as convenient stepping stones to enforce their will over others. The Internet has largely transformed the business over the years and one can see that from the amount of packets that are now being delivered throughout the year. The job is difficult enough now by itself without unions and management endlessly scheming behind the scenes! My central issue with later starting times is that posties are being set up to fail from the offset with packet deliveries. Nowadays, people order so much on the internet throughout the week - that unless you start delivering early in the morning - you're guaranteed not to get a response from the customers (P.S. because most people start work at 9am). It is possible to get rid of the packets on occasions (i.e. next door neighbours), although this solely rests on the luck of the day. In my opinion, it makes logical sense for postmen/women to start delivering mail early in the morning. It is contrary to reason to expect posties to start later in the day when they NEED to get to their delivery points earlier on in the day. It defies commonsense on all fronts.
  • Postman F.
    [...] The postman loses his bike and gets something more rubbish …Sep 9, 2010 … Fat Postman, you say almost the same thing as my father-in-law who has been in the post service for 30 odd years albeit in the sorting office. [...]
  • Leigh H.
    To be honest, I am not really opposed to change because it can often result in so many improvements - depending upon how that change is executed. In time, all things change and you either change with them or get left behind. The job, in some respects, is a very different one today than it was in the past and for this reason I would argue that keeping things the same - is not really an option when the things around you are constantly changing e.g. new and different companies coming to the forefront offering competition to Royal Mail. However, if there is one thing that change should never be doing under any circumstances is this: it should not be making you're working life more difficult or miserable. Change should be a positive tool of enrichment and choice in any given job and I would argue that although companies have to embrace new opportunities and challenges in the modern day - this should not pass as an excuse for changing EVERYTHING. I can so no reason why tradition and sentimentality have to be discarded and trodden upon because they are not perceived as progressive attributes. Embrace the old and the new and a healthy balance will be achieved!
  • Bob M.
    As a retired postal worker thirty four years service the first eleven with a delivery bag on my back.i am at a loss to understand how delivering mail at 13-30pm and later is improving the service.I joined as a young man in 1972 but by 2006 i was fed up along with many other long serving men and women.Management have lost the plot and public loyalty,the job has it's own newspaper The Courier what a propaganda piece of crap that is.Staff are worn down and worn out.Most hate the job.
  • Leigh H.
    Could not agree more Bob. I can see nothing progressive about delivering letters midday in this particular job. Posties NEED to get to their delivery points early in the morning to catch people before they go to work. Particularly nowadays, with the rise of the internet and packet deliveries, posties should be getting out earlier than ever before in my opinion. I would not have a problem starting my delivery at 9-10am if all we had to deliver was mail and small packets that would fit through letterboxes - but sadly this is not the case. Two people cramped in a pint-sized van, unable to effectively priortise huge volumes of internet packets - loaded on top of umpteen bags. My God, how can anyone with any degree of rational thought - consider this to be an efficient and progressive step forward. I am simply at a complete loss to explain the reasoning behind these decisions. To my understanding, 2+2 = 4. Somehow, I am presently arriving at a 6. My cynical sense is that, like religion, authority craves control over it's members.

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