Spotify becomes even more essential with offline playlists

2 October 2009

logoIf you’re a premium subscriber to ace streaming online music jukebox Spotify, you’re now suddenly getting a lot more for your tenner a month – even though you don’t get to hear their ads starring the lovely Roberta from Spotify.

Subscribers can now make their saved playlists available offline, which essentially means that the music will be saved to their hard drive, allowing them to access it even when they’re away from an Internet connection.

The offline mode is already available to Spotify subscribers who have the service on their iPhone, and as with the mobile version, they’ll be able to store 3,333 tracks at a time.

offline-5As of earlier this week, new subscribers can also pay their monthly fee via Paypal as well as with a debit or credit card as Spotify increasingly becomes a viable alternative to illegal downloading.

Have you signed up for the premium service recently and is it everything you hoped it would be? Or have you dipped your toe in the premium water before going back to the ad-filled free version. Maybe you’re as mad as a badger and don’t believe in its overpowering majesty. Spill it.


    I paid the £10 sub just to test the iphone app, and I don't plan on cancelling it soon. Before you all comments like the idiots on the app store about how £10 is too expensive etc etc, may I remind you, I'm absolutely fucking loaded, and don't give a damn if you poor disgraceful scummy losers can't afford it. I can, because I'm better than you. Bye!
  • Simon B.
    Is it just me or is the premium service very similar to what many of us have used for a few years now with Napster? I pay £10 a month to them for a service which lets me download tunes to up to three PC's for offline use and lets me stream through it's own app, a browser or a Squeezebox. The difference is the route to market of through ads first with Spotify. Having used both I think the range of music is better on Napster so would suggest some Spotify converts give that a go too.
  • Mark
    Difference is with Napster is that is has no free version, afaik? You're right in saying that the free, ad-version of spotify is a nice entry into the market. I use the free version, own an android phone, and have about 20 playlists of different songs to listen to. I'm considering subscribing due to how heavily i use it ... but in my opinion there's just not enough bang for the buck. No Beatles, no Metallica, no dice with me. I was a real skeptic of how good spotify actually was, as newsgroups pretty much covered me when it came to downloading (torrent'ers dont know what you're missing out on) but i find myself streaming from spotify before downloading the album now. TL;DR: spotify is good but needs something game-breaking
  • CompactDstrxion
    I agree Simon, the only true innovation on Spotify is the free version. There are plenty of subscription-based streaming services around.
  • Jeffrey A.
    Give me windows mobile spotify and I'll give them £10 a month. Until then, its Knock Off Nigel for me.
  • Mark
    Spotify's massive advantage over a lot of the other subscription services is that it allows you to cache music on an iPod. I subscribed as soon as the iPod/iPhone version was released and will continue. It's replaced my need to buy albums and allowing me to listen to albums I would otherwise not have bought. The only people complaining about the tenner a month subscription are those torrenting or newsgrouping their music for free. How about giving some money back to the artists and music companies you tight wads?

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