Crime-fighting laptops to include GPS and remote disabling

12 December 2008

Attention! Are you a forgetful civil servant, cack-handed recruitment officer of a dim-witted spy who can't remember whether they left the gas on this morning? You are? Good news! Ericsson has developed just the gadget to save your neck when you invariably leave your laptop chock-full of Government secrets / personal data / hardcore German pornography on a train / the front seat of your car / in a restaurant etc etc:

Ericsson has announced it will begin manufacturing mobile broadband modules compatible with Intel's Anti-Theft Technology. Likely to be built into commercially available laptops in the second half of next year, the device will allow laptops to be remotely disabled, ensuring no thieving little scroates profit from their ill-gotten gains. Better yet, the module will include in-built GPS to ensure the laptop can be recovered, and the local plod can go Gene-Hunt on the guilty party. Or alternatively, file some paperwork.

[engadget]

TOPICS:   Motoring

6 comments

  • Jakg
    Wooo - Go HP Compaq Business laptops (In pic). Better idea - on small laptops (12" and below) have this + TomTom technology to make a very nice SatNav. Wish my Asus eee could be a SatNav...
  • chrisg
    Ericsson, you mean?
  • Andrew D.
    Why not just keep your hard disc encrypted?
  • James
    how is encrypting a hard disc going to recover the laptop... and most users store the password for the disc in the laptop bag. about time... should get it onboard on every device.
  • Rubisco
    It would be easy to stop one of these from recieving a signal. The only way to curb this is if it stopped working if it couldn't get a connection. I don't want a laptop that only works within mobile phone coverage!
  • Travis T.
    We eventually had to start seeing GPS devices and receivers being built into consumer laptops. We're already using them in our phones to keep our friends update on the location we're at (using Twitter and other location-aware social networking apps). Imagine opening up Google Earth and it pinpointing your exact location without you typing in anything, making it easier to locate what's around you. I know this can be achieved already external or bluetooth GPS receivers, but having it built in is one less device you have to carry with you. A logical step, in my opinion.

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