What's Android Pay?

What's Android Pay?
18 May 2016

As of today, Android Pay is very much a real thing, and it is being supported by the retailers of the UK.

As Apple Pay, and other banking apps, it is Google's mobile payment app, so you can purchase items from your favourite stores with a tap of your smartphone.

It uses NFC technology, so basically, all you do is unlock your phone, hold it next to a special reader, and you pay for things like you would if you were doing a contactless payment with your credit or debit card.

If you're buying something online, Android Pay users will see a new options which says "Buy with [Android] Pay", and you'll be able to complete a purchase with a single tap.

The service launched in the US last year, and the UK is the second place to get it, and it is compatible with any Android device that is running KitKat 4.4 with NFC and HCE capabilities.

Some retailers are already accepting these payments, such as Waitrose, Boots, and Greggs, but it might take a while for the whole of the high street to catch on.

You can also use your Android smartphone to make contactless payments on the London transport network.

In addition to all that, there's going to be a thing called Android Pay Day, which is a special offers day at the end of each month. In short, certain shops will offer discounts on this day, should you use Android Pay. Starbucks and Deliveroo will be some of the first companies to offer this.

Pretty much all the major banks have signed-up with Android Pay, apart from Barclays, as we've mentioned before.

How much can you spend with Android Pay? Well, according to their official blurb, it says: "You can make transactions up to £30 without unlocking your phone. For transactions higher than £30, you can enter your security method (pin, pattern, fingerprint)."

Is the app safe? Again, according to Google, "security is at the centre of Android Pay" and the technology uses "industry standard security tokenisation", which Google developed with people at AMEX, MasterCard and Visa.

"When you shop at a store, Android Pay won't send your actual credit or debit card number with your payment," said Google; "Instead, we'll use a virtual account number to represent your account information - providing you with an extra layer of security."

"And if your phone is ever lost or stolen, simply use Android Device Manager to instantly lock your device from anywhere, secure it with a new password or even wipe it clean of your personal information," Google added.

TOPICS:   Mobile   Technology   Banking

2 comments

  • preecey

    "Some retailers are already accepting these payments, such as Waitrose, Boots, and Greggs, but it might take a while for the whole of the high street to catch on."

    Err, no. Any retailer that currently accepts contactless will also accept Android Pay from day one.

  • The_Face

    What's the advantage of this over your contactless debit card?

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