Yellow Pages RIP

14 July 2011

yellow pagesThe famous Yellow Pages is going to die. That's right. Owd codgers like J R Hartley are going to be left wanting as they have their phonebooks ripped from their trembling hands, shoved face first before a computer they don't understand.

J R Hartley is going to shrivel up and die.

That's because the company behind the iconic directory is moving the core of its business online in a 4 year plan will see it becoming an online hub for local businesses.

Firms selling their services via the site will be tempted with loyalty schemes, marketing initiatives and computer software to help them do their accounting and the like.

The book itself has been sidelined in favour of users going online for information, but it still serves a vital role in rural areas where the internet connection is either slower than sickly snail, or indeed, non-existent.

On the new online Yellow Pages, Chief executive Mike Pocock says: "It will be a single site where consumers can get access to all their local merchants and understand what services they offer."

Oh! The Yellow Pages symbol is some hands walking across some pages. Only just got that. Brilliant. It isn't a robot walking on water at all. Marvellous news that.

TOPICS:   High Street News   Technology   Economy   Health


  • qwertyuiop
    Good luck to Yellow pages surviving without their book. Most people either smart, capable or young enough to use the internet probably aren't going to go looking to them for the numbers they need. In a single stroke, they are alienating the audience the service was provided for originally! Imbeciles!
  • A i.
    Thank Christ for that, I was getting fed up with having to dump the damn thing in the recycling every time they delivered it.
  • Bawbag
    About time, no one used them any way and they just cluttered up the place until they were taken to the recycling. It was a dead business model 10 years ago plus.
  • Author
    Love the bit about the robot on water! Must agree that there may be a need for it in places (people) where (for whom) access to the internet is limited but that just isn't enough for a business to run...

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