'Duffin' creator in huff with Starbucks

9 October 2013

The tedious trend for hybrid desserts is getting nastier than a Marmite Cronut on a bed of tripe. It seems that Starbucks have started selling ‘Duffins’ – a cross between a doughnut and a muffin – and have trademarked the name. But pastry chef Bea Vo, of Bea’s of Bloomsbury, claims she invented the Duffin and has been selling them at her four London bakeries for 2 years.


The Duffin is made using a buttermilk and nutmeg batter, which is baked and stuffed with strawberry jam, then dipped in butter and covered in icing sugar. The Starbucks Duffin, which has been registered by Starbuck’s supplier Rich Products Ltd, is made using buttermilk and nutmeg batter, which is baked and stuffed with strawberry jam, but they don’t bother with the butter dip.

Ms Vo blasted the coffee chain, saying that it was inferior to her creation. She explained: ‘I didn't really give it too much thought until I found out their version of the duffin also contains raspberry jam, nutmeg and buttermilk. My recipe, which was published in my cookbook back in August 2011, is the only one out there to carry all of those traits. Doughnut muffins have been around for a while, Nigella Lawson even has them in her first cookbook - but the style of mine, that is what makes it unique.’

(Not anymore.)

Starbucks covered up their corporate Satan face with a realistic reasonable human mask and said: ‘Since launching, we have discovered there are other Duffins out there in the UK, including at Bea's of Bloomsbury… however we'd like to make it clear that neither Starbucks nor Rich's Products has suggested to Bea's of Bloomsbury that they will attempt to stop them selling their own Duffins.’

Time to make up another crap novelty cake. What about a Doughmuff?

TOPICS:   High Street News   Complaints


  • Her L.
    Come on Lucy, you know it's all about the Muffnut.
  • Shiftyniftysshadow
    It's all about the donut....
  • Euan
    Are Starbucks going to withdraw their trademark application, then? Since there's demonstrably prior art?

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