Britain's polarisation shown in supermarket habits

20 July 2011

supermarket_sweep_bThe state of the economy is troubling British consumers and it's showing in our collective shopping habits.

It appears that many shoppers are cutting back and shopping at the budget end of the scale while those who have money are still getting their goos from the higher end of the market, leaving the middle ground struggling.

Research company, Kantar Worldpanel, have put Waitrose at one end and Aldi and Lidl at the other, showing both extremes thriving in the current market.

Aldi and Lidl showed strong growth of 20.2 per cent and 15.6 per cent respectively, with Waitrose next on the list, with a growth of 9 per cent. Meanwhile, the rest of the supermarkets have struggled to make progress.

“The increasing polarisation of the grocery market looks set to stay as consumers turn to the discounters to cut their budgets while others continue to spend in Waitrose,” says Kantar Worldpanel director Martin Whittingham. “This divergence seems to be reflective of some contrasting lifestyles in the UK at the moment.”

Kantar's figures suggest that Tesco is losing its share in a market slumping post Royal Wedding and Easter. A spell of good weather saw consumers flinging their money about without much care, but since then, there's been a collective belt-tightening.

Is this an early sign of boom or bust in Britain?

5 comments

  • Elizabeth
    Waitrose is for the lower classes too. Most decent people shop at Fortnum's.
  • The B.
    I'll shop anywhere there's a bargain, even Tesco. I went into Asda Crossharbour today and they had Gillette Fusion Proglides with 2 blades for £4, not too shoddy as 6 blades are pushing £20 so I cleaned them out.
  • SgtMunky
    my local Tesco didn't have strawberries or raspberries for nearly 3 weeks, and only had them back in yesterday Tesco fruit and veg is awful, over ripe lifeless produce, and I always shop somewhere else for fresh stuff if I want to keep it longer than 6 hours
  • Bloke
    You can keep Tesco plums for more than six hours. They are like squash balls for about a week, then have a five-minute window when they're edible. Then they're rubbish. But my local greengrocer closed down. Too many "continental" convenience stores selling 9th-rate fruit on treatle tables in front of the shop, blocking the pavements.
  • Harry M.
    'It appears that many shoppers are cutting back and shopping at the budget end of the scale while those who have money are still getting their goos from the higher end of the market....' My missus gets her goo delivered straight from my plums - zing!!! Bet this doesn't make it on

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