Hummus - more salt than 4 bags of crisps

28 July 2016
Hummus more salt than

Have you been laying off the chocolate and crisps, and feeling a bit healthier by getting stuck into healthy dips, like hummus and such?

Bad news. Turns out that these dips are loaded up with salt and fat, that's why they're so much fun to eat, and some pots have got more salt than four packets of crisps.

And you'd rather eat four packets of crisps in one setting wouldn't you?

Some people called Consensus Action on Salt and Health (CASH) are hitting out against hummus, potentially incurring the wrath of middle class families and getting people in Clark's shoes more angry than a wasp trapped in a pop can.

The campaign group tested 210 chilled dips from high street supermarkets, and they found that a total of zero packets were marked with a green traffic light for salt. The green traffic light means that they have a low level of salt.

Of all the dips, taramasalata was the most salty, and the least salty was salsa which has an average of 0.49g of salt per 100g.

The headline grabbing salty hummus dip is the Caramelised Onion Hummus pot from Marks & Spencer's, which has 1.53g per 100g, which is more than four packets of ready salted crisps.

There's 1.6g per 100g in the Tesco Caramelised Onion Hummus, (which they spell 'houmous'), which is more salt than a 100g pack of KP original salted peanuts.

All this chat means we want to eat a load of salted peanuts, crisps, and dip them all into a load of hummus that has caramelised onions on top of them. We'll take the heart disease, every time.

Away from hummus, a tub of Essential Waitrose Sour Cream and Chive dip has more fat than a Big Mac in total.

Sonia Pombo, campaign manager for CASH, said: "Food companies need to take action and reduce both the salt and fat content in dips."

"The variation of different products revealed in our survey shows it can be achieved which is why it's equally important that we as individuals read the label carefully and opt for healthier brands."

"Also remember to swap unhealthy sides with vegetables e.g. carrots, peppers and tomatoes, for added bonus."

TOPICS:   Health   High Street News

What do you think?

Connect with Facebook, Twitter, or just enter your email to sign in and comment.

Your comment