Yet another call for a ban on adverts for sugar

30 November 2015

sugar-is-a-drug There's more calls for bans on adverts that basically promote sugar. A report, released today, wants to the government to be "bold and brave" and try and tackle Britain's obesity. The report doesn't want healthy eating campaigns, but rather, promoting exercise.

Members of the Commons health committee think that it is time for a "far more ambitious" approach, and they recommend the banning of junk food adverts before the 9pm on TV, more control over what junk food deals supermarkets can do, warnings on drinks that have a load of sugar in, a 20% tax on full-sugar drinks with any money raised going to preventing childhood obesity, and a complete ban on supermarkets putting sweets near checkouts.

They also want to see an end to the use of cartoon characters and celebrities in children's ads, and new guidelines on what a healthy school packed lunch looks like.

Dr Sarah Wollaston, the health committee's chair, think the government aren't doing enough. There's an idea that too much money is wasted on people being fat, when you could probably argue that just as much money is wasted on reports like this, which never result in anything being done about anything.

Anyway, Wollaston said: "What we felt was that the problem is so great that it’s time for action and just taking gentle measures that tinker at the edges won’t have the effect we need. If the problem is great enough we need to do something that makes a difference. A quarter of children from the most disadvantaged families are leaving school not just overweight but obese. That’s just wholly unacceptable."

Of course, these taxes have been tried in other countries and they haven't worked too well - fact is, sugary things taste nice and there's not a great deal you can do about that. With official figures showing that obesity among children younger than 10 years old is falling, you wonder if this is a problem that is already on the way to being fixed?

Either way, would you like to see a sugar tax or not?

TOPICS:   Government   Health

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