Dixons looking to close 60 high street stores and transform others into 'urban toyshops'

22 June 2012

PC Worlds meets Currys Dixons Retail look set to ‘downsize’ their operation in the UK with as many as 60 high street stores highlighted for closure. Reeling from losses of £119m last year, their boss man says they could have as few as 30-40 stores by 2016.

In a move that makes them sound like a non-Apple version of the Apple stores, Sebastian James said they would be ‘urban toyshops’ and would be ‘full of fun, exciting new technology’.

James pointed out the Dixons store in swankypants Westfield, Stratford, saying that: “We think that is a great model. It’s trading its socks off.” It sells socks as well? Cool.

It is believed that the total number Dixons Retail stores would drop from 530 to about 400, with most of them combining Currys and PC World. But the good news is that they don’t envisage any redundancies as part of the process.

TOPICS:   Games

6 comments

  • Her L.
    This is exactly what we want from high street stores, an environment where we can play about with gadge and tech to our little hearts content. Then go online and buy it from Amazon...
  • Spencer
    If DSG wised up... they'd display online prices in the store - and agree a cut of the profits with said retailer. Even a flat fee of a few pounds from currys to the online retailer I think would swing it. That way as a consumer we'd be encouraged to go into B&M stores and shop around knowing we'd be getting the best online price possible. That way more people buy from stores increasing both profit and turnover (thereby avoiding closures and administration), we as consumers stop getting ripped off as we know we're getting the best possible online price, we also get the convenience of a B&M store where we can browse and see products up close, and it encourages online retailers to keep their prices competitive - whoever has the lowest price gets the cut from currys - this means a constant price war among online outlets in search of the DSG cut.
  • Retailer
    If you'd read the rest of the Trading statement you'd have seen Seb James statement that the group consider 600 stores in the UK the optimum number. That's more than 400.
  • Her L.
    Read a press statement? What do you think this is, fucking Which?
  • ex m.
    Spencer your idea will not work. The cost of running a high St store far outweighs the profit margin that would be made selling at web prices. This is exactly why dixons are downsizing their high St stores. People already do use them as a showroom for the internet. But seeing as there's virtually no margin to be made in the main item itself, especially at web prices, the pressure to sell addons like warranties would be even higher on the under paid staff. If dixons group just sold computers and TVs etc with no kind of extended service or any other addons, they wouldn't make enough to survive. So the proposed high St gadget toy shops will be placed in areas with a high disposable income, where its more likely that the people buying will take that monthly cover. But even so, a lot of punters would still just go lock at a store that had web equivalent prices and then go tell the staff to f-off when they start trying to sell them the add ons and go buy it online anyway. You can't have a shop that runs at web prices, with staff who know anything about the products and yet still makes enough profit to survive. The best thing they could do is let amazon turn all the old currys digital stores into amazon collection point stores. You buy online and instead of it being delivered to your house, its to a local store where you collect it on your own time. The staff are paid basic minimum wage and have no product knowledge and don't have to sell at all.
  • She S.
    The best thing they could do is let amazon turn all the old currys digital stores into amazon collection point stores. You buy online and instead of it being delivered to your house, its to a local store where you collect it on your own time. The staff are paid basic minimum wage and have no product knowledge and don’t have to sell at all. We've already got one very similar, it's called Argos.

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