Stamps soon hitting the £1 mark

8 April 2013

039stamp_468x541 The Save Our Royal Mail campaigners have claimed, in the face of the expected sell-off of the Royal Mail, that the price of a first class stamp is going to spike as their VAT-free status is likely to vanish.

That means, in real money, first class postage is going to be pushing a quid before you know it.

Tory MP, Brian Binley, who oversees the work of Royal Mail said: "Before the Government rushes into selling off Royal Mail, it is essential to ensure that the services currently enjoyed by the public, can be guaranteed. This should include a very careful look at how future price rises will adversely affect businesses."

A Business, Innovations and Skills spokesman added: "Royal Mail will continue to be the designated universal service provider regardless of its ownership. An ownership change would not, therefore, trigger a change in the current VAT exemption which applies to first and second class stamps as part of the one price, anywhere service."

While this initially seems like an absolute joke, is it actually that bad a thing? In a climate that sees most people sending texts and emails or messages through social media, should we actually care how much it is to send a letter? Of course, there are elderly people who rely on the postal service, but you cheapskates should be buying nana a book of stamps so she can stay in touch, right?

Is the Royal Mail effectively a spent force which is going to have to become a company like UPS, dealing only in competitive package-sending rates?

TOPICS:   Economy

13 comments

  • Haggis
    Mental. If any of this cuntsack of a governments rhetoric had an iota of truth they would be working to increase the reliability and decrease the cost of infrastructure like RM, not privatise everything in sight. There's nothing more attractive to small businesses (the only real 'job creators') than an inexpensive and reliable infrastructure.
  • Daily M.
    ^ What he said ^
  • Han S.
    Can't remember the last time I sent a letter but if you're going to privatise Royal Mail what's the point in giving it a continuing monopoly? Sorry allowing it to be the 'designated universal service provider'. Let other companies set themselves up as competition.
  • Wavydavy
    With some price rises of over 130% since 2nd April I'll be glad to see other companies take them on
  • Han S.
    Surprised Thatcher hasn't weighed in to the privatisation debate
  • dvdj10
    You do realise that Royal Mail are used for a lot more than just old people sending letters? Approximately 70% of our deliveries get sent out via Royal Mail so long as they fall in to a certain criteria such as value etc. I'm sure this is also the case for a lot of retailers. And guess who the cost will end up being passed on to one way or another? Not our P&L accounts I can tell you. For a consumer blog you're pretty shit at stuff like this.
  • kv
    Mof must have been reading the Daily Fail, or some similar rag.
  • bargain h.
    £1 for a first class stamp is ridiculous, they were less than 30p not too long ago.. how do they justify such a crazy rise in price? in my experience the service has got slower over the last few years if anything.
  • Wavydavy
    They've got to clear their Pension deficit somehow
  • Han S.
    To be fair if I gave you a quid and asked you to take a letter to Aberdeen for me I'm pretty sure you'd tell me to fuck off
  • Grammar N.
    @ Han Solo - well obviously, but then asking a massive company with the infrastructure that Royal Mail has is not really the same as asking an individual is it?
  • JonB
    I wouldn't care about the cost of stamps if the government would allow you to do everything online. As it is you have to send most things to them by post, e.g. driver's licence, tax forms, passport applications, etc. In addition to that there are things like sending documents to a solicitor and some warranty registrations which still need to be sent in by post.
  • Dick
    It hasn't been under 30p since 2005/6.

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