'White spaces' could boost British broadband

17 November 2009

White_Stripes,_Jack_and_Meg_White Britain’s crappy broadband infrastructure could be heading for a major shake-up, with Ofcom exploring the possible use of firing broadband at us using what are known as ‘white spaces’ – namely the unoccupied radio waves used as buffers between TV broadcast channels.

Introduction of white space use could prove to be an enormous boon for those in rural areas with little or no broadband access (and we’re always on the look-out for enormous boons). Other uses for the white spaces could include the ability for digital cameras to immediately transmit photos back to a chosen computer and the ability to control domestic appliances from miles away.

So when last orders comes around, you’d be able to heat up your pizza before you left the pub and have it ready and waiting for you when you got in. That, or your house would burn down after you forgot about said pizza in order to have one last round or go on to a nite klub.

There’s already been a frantic debate over white spaces in the United States Of Americana – Google, Microsoft and Yahoo have joined forces to champion their use but met stern opposition in the shape of entertainment legends Neil Diamond, Guns n’ Roses and Dolly ‘Tits, Teeth & Tech’ Parton, who claim that the new technology would affect the use of radio microphones in their shows.

For Ofcom, the key is to ensure that white spaces can be used safely and effectively without upsetting the likes of Neil Diamond. And that, dear readers, is one hell of an ask.


TOPICS:   Broadband


  • Mike B.
    Love the pic of the White Stripes very good!
  • Brian
    Hi, Brian here. My mother thinks they look like the YOUNG Sonny & Cher.
  • Guybrush T.
    On a frequency/wavelength spectrum the white spaces are narrow bands which could be called stripes I suppose. Love the pedantry.
  • Boris J.
    Oh God, I don't half fancy Meg White.
  • Le S.
    Really love your opinion. Hope teeth bleaching site can assist someone out there.

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