You can benefit from next year's pension changes even if you're retiring now

19 August 2014

pensioner They don't make old people like they use to do they? Once upon a time they were all hunched over and angry, and now they've all got tracksuits and dancing lessons.

Either way, if you're old and planning to collect your pension next year, you'll have more options than ever to take your cash and run. If you're retiring this week, you can also benefit from the new rules that are coming in next year.

There's a relaxation in pension rules from next April, which means it is easier for old people to take their entire pot in cash (income tax pending, naturally). If you're retiring before April you can still take advantage if you rest your cash in a 'capped drawdown' scheme until next year.

What's that when it's at home?

Well, capped drawdown pays out income from a pension based on the GAD rate set by the Government Actuary’s Department (GAD) and at the moment, allows retirees to take 150% of the equivalent annuity rate.

A company called Hargreaves Lansdown has launched a simplified capped drawdown plan called ‘retirement bridge’ (don't worry, there's not many steps for you to walk up) which provides you codgers access to your money, with a 25% tax-free lump sum and access to income if you need it (that'll be taxed though).

Tom McPhail, head of pensions research at Hargreaves Lansdown, said there were many people retiring who want to take advantage of next year’s flexibility, but didn't want to buy a pricey drawdown product or short-term annuity.

"There are relatively few ways for people to access some, or all, of their pension now,’ he said. "Insurers have come up with temporary solutions [such as short-term annuities] but in the main you need to go through an independent financial adviser and the costs of doing that are not insignificant."

"I am quite concerned that a lot of people are hitting retirement today who are not being offered this option," he said. "They think their options are either annuity or [full] drawdown, which will be complex and expensive. There are a huge number of people just treading water who are not sure what their options are. Some people do need to access the money… and others are waiting to see what happens and are reluctant to commit until they know what the rules are."

Check the charges though - if you have a smaller pension, drawdown might not be the thing for you.

You should check your pension contracts before moving your money around though. Some older pensions have guarantees that can offer good annuity rates or the ability to take more than 25% tax-free cash, which you might lose if you move your money.

Always check your old policies before doing anything and phone up your provider and ask them if you can have the tax-free cash and leave the balance of your pension in scheme.

TOPICS:   Banking   Government

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