Get ready for plastic banknotes

23 May 2014

Rather than the tatty, coke-impregnated bits of scrap paper that pass for money these days, the Clydesdale bank is introducing a shiny new plastic note next year, to commemorate the 125th anniversary of the Forth Bridge.

Like most things that Westminster isn’t 100% sure about, like Poll Tax and stuff, the polymer notes will be introduced in Scotland first, and then will come into circulation in England in 2016.

The fiver will feature a picture of the bridge with a hairy old engineer on the back.


And to prove that it’s not entirely random, what’s the betting that someone at the Clydesdale Bank will mumble some weak symbolic link between the ground breaking bridge and plastic money?

‘The structure is renowned across the world as an incredible feat of engineering so it was a fitting choice for a ground-breaking new banknote. The Forth Bridge’s super structure certainly lends itself to the intricate processes of banknote printing, combining security, durability and an aesthetically-striking design.'


The bank haven’t yet decided whether more polymer notes will be produced yet, but it will be the first to feature the exciting sounding Spark Orbital security mark. And as Scotland pioneered all the cool stuff, like telly, the Beano and fried pizza suppers, chances are its new banknote technology will soon catch on everywhere else.

Mind you, judging by the photo, it's pretty big, innit?

TOPICS:   Banking   Travel   Economy


  • jim
    lol is that a fiver in my pocket or am i just pleased to see you. seriously though can you still roll them up and have a toot? flex wid da erb
  • Dacouch
    So I'm guessing Clydesdale Bank are expecting Scotland to vote no if they investing in plastic bank notes that are more expensive to produce but last longer.
  • Han S.
    It'll soon catch on everywhere else? Like Australia, Bermuda, Brunei, Canada, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Romania, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Brazil, Chile, Dominican Republic, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Israel, Malaysia, Mexico, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Samoa, Singapore and Zambia who already use them?

What do you think?

Connect with Facebook, Twitter, or just enter your email to sign in and comment.

Your comment