American Apparel ads get banned and therefore, many more views

5 December 2012

In a bid to lose every single reader we have, before you start reading the news, type 'Banned American Apparel ads' into Google Images and see what happens.

Yep. A lot of bums and boobs, all in the name of advertising socks, scads and stockings. American Apparel are well known for using risque images to flog their wares and, of course, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) aren't happy, banning a bunch of images and in turn, giving American Apparel much more publicity than the original ads could ever hope for.

The ASA said that it was "offensive and irresponsible" to use some of the images as they sexualised a model that looked under-16 and that these could be viewed by minors. Elsewhere, some other ads for hosiery website were deemed "unnecessarily sexual and inappropriate", "sexually suggestive and gratuitous" and "submissive and sexually suggestive."

Of course, American Apparel have defended themselves, saying that "it was standard practice to market hosiery, intimates or lingerie in the way done on their website" arguing that rival retailers sell similar products in a similar fashion which can also be viewed by kids.
Sections of the press aren't happy either, with The Telegraph getting wearily aroused, saying: "One of the photographs found to breach the rules was of a woman wearing high denier tights but nothing else, bending forwards with her back to the camera. Another was of a woman wearing white tights but nothing else, curled up on a sofa, facing the camera. One of her breasts was visible."

An ASA spokesman said: "We considered the model looked under the age of 16. We acknowledged that her poses were not overtly sexual but, because her breasts were visible through her shirt, we considered the images could be seen to sexualise a model who appeared to be a child. We concluded the images were inappropriate and irresponsible."

TOPICS:   Advertising   High Street News

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