Posts Tagged ‘scam’

UK Power Networks – they might nick your bike

April 17th, 2015 2 Comments By Mof Gimmers

UK Power Network 222x300 UK Power Networks   they might nick your bikeIn The Internet Is Full Of Grasses news now, and one man has confronted a UK Power Networks employee, who was filmed (allegedly) trying to steal someone’s bike.

A bloke called Paul spied the incident from a window on Caledonian Road, saying that the worker used bolt cutters to chop the lock before throwing the bike into the back of his van.

Paul told Metro.co.uk: “UK Power Networks have been working on the road for quite some time. I was on the phone leaning against the window and one of them wasn’t working and looking quite suspicious so my attention falls on him.”

“Then he goes over to the bike and cuts the lock. He waited for some time, then he walked back over and took the bike.”

At this point, our Paul went outside to have a word and of course, he filmed the whole thin. He asked the UK Power Networks employee why he had the bike in the van. He claims; ‘”because it was there dumped”. However, our gallant hero points out that this is a load of cobblers, leaving the worker to deny cutting the lock and repeatedly saying ‘sorry mate’.

A spokesperson for UK Power Networks said: “We take any allegations of wrongdoing extremely seriously and will follow all appropriate procedures to ensure a full investigation is carried out and relevant action is taken.”

“We are currently liaising with the person who recorded the film to ensure the matter is resolved.”

Have a look at this yourself and you can decide whether or not this bloke is a dirty tea-leaf.

A steward for Ryanair found a passenger’s camera on a flight. Now, you’d think they’d hand it in to lost property and that would be the end of it, right?

Well, this particular steward thought he’d have it for himself and flog it on eBay. Fernando Miguel Andrade Viseu didn’t realise these things can be tracked and on the auction, he found he’d got a message from the owner.

The camera owner, a teacher called Aaron Galloway, was going on a break when he forgot his camera on the seat of the plane. He told the crew about it and they said they saw no sign of the £499 Nikon camera.

Galloway got home, looked on eBay and BAM, there it was. And so, he sent the vendor a message.

ad166057305email exchanges 500x396 Ryanair steward steals camera and tries to sell it on eBay... however...

Viseu replied, saying how dreadfully sorry he was and that the camera would be returned at the airport.

ad166057303email exchanges 500x266 Ryanair steward steals camera and tries to sell it on eBay... however...

How did it end?

Well, Viseu was promptly arrested and ordered to pay compensation of £145 and carry out 100 hours of community service. Oh, and now he’s on the internet known as a snide.

A spokesman for Essex Police said: “We arrested a 34-year-old man from the Stansted area on Friday February 20 on suspicion of theft. He was taken to Stansted area police station where he was interviewed and subsequently charged with theft of a camera and a Kindle.”

What do Ryanair think of it all? They said: “While we don’t comment on legal matters, we can confirm that this individual no longer works for Ryanair.”

Holidaymakers conned out of billions

April 13th, 2015 2 Comments By Mof Gimmers

holiday 300x233 Holidaymakers conned out of billionsGoing on holiday this year? Lucky you. Unless, that is, you’re being swizzed out of money by internet ne’er-do-wells.

A report from the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has fired off a warning to you sun-worshippers, saying that some holidaymakers who have booked vacations online have been collectively conned out of £2.2m in 2014.

Crims have been targeting online booking firms to swipe money from unsuspecting folk, and many of those only find out that they’ve been had once they arrive at their hotel, who tell them that there’s no record of their booking.

The NFIB report shows, during a 12-month period, that 1,569 cases of holiday booking fraud were reported to the police’s fraud squad, with most complaints relating to plane tickets, hacking accounts, posting fake adverts online and setting-up bogus sites. Two groups particularly targeted were sports fans and religious groups, paying for fake tickets to religious sites and/or sporting events, where places are limited and people can charge more.

Mark Tanzer, ABTA chief executive, said: “Holiday fraud is a particularly distressing form of fraud as the loss to the victim is not just financial but it can also have a high emotional impact. Many victims are unable to get away on a long-awaited holiday or visit to loved ones and the financial loss is accompanied by a personal loss.”

“We would also encourage anyone who has been the victim of a travel-related fraud to report it so that the police can build up a case, catch the perpetrators and prevent other unsuspecting people from falling victim.”

Apple and Android vulnerable to Freak Attack!

March 4th, 2015 No Comments By Mof Gimmers

apple android Apple and Android vulnerable to Freak Attack!Another day, another attack on people using gadgets to get on the internet. This time, something called Freak Attack (which sounds like an ace ’80s horror b-movie) is causing a headache for users of Android and Apple devices.

The good news is that there are no reports of this weakness being exploited (yet) and that the relevant companies are working quickly to shore up the flaw… but where has all this come from? Well, researchers reckon that the problem comes from code that came about from old government policies which required software developers to use weaker security in encryption programmes, thanks to that old chestnut of ‘international security concerns’.

The flaw is to do with web encryption technology, which could potentially enable bad people to spy on what you’re doing if you use Safari or Google’s Android browser.

Around a third of all encrypted sites were vulnerable as of yesterday, as sites continued to accept this weaker software, which affects Apple’s browsers, the Android browser, but not Google Chrome browser or the latest versions from Firefox or Microsoft.

Apple and Google have both said that they’ve fixed the Freak Attack flaw, with Apple rolling theirs out next week and Google saying that they’ve sent out the goods to device makers and wireless carriers.

Obviously, this highlights the problems with governments interfering with encryption codes, even when dealing with national security. This old policy has come back to bite it on the arse, as it could well do the opposite of what it was intended to do, and actually give a helping hand to criminals.

Until a rollout occurs, you’d be wise to use Chrome, Firefox or Microsoft’s browser or, indeed, ride your luck until the new security measures are in place, if you’re feeling saucy.

TalkTalk customer data stolen in hack

February 27th, 2015 1 Comment By Mof Gimmers

TalkTalk 300x225 TalkTalk customer data stolen in hackAnother day, another hack and this time, customers of TalkTalk are being warned after a load of account numbers, names and personal details were stolen from them. Be on the lookout for people trying to scam you, basically.

In an email sent to all TalkTalk customers, the company said that ne’er-do-wells were using the swiped details to try and trick people into handing over their bank details. If you received the email, you’ll find a special phone line to call if you’ve been targeted.

The number is 0800 083 2710.

This scam was discovered after TalkTalk found that there was a very sudden spike in people complaining to them about scam calls at the end of last year. A spokesperson said: ”We have now concluded a thorough investigation working with an external security company, and we have become aware that some limited non-sensitive information may have been illegally accessed in violation of our security procedure.”

It seems that the hack came about via a third-party who also had access to TalkTalk’s network and, as a result, the company will be taking legal action against the aforementioned third-party.

“We are aware of a small, but nonetheless significant, number of customers who have been directly targeted by these criminals and we have been supporting them directly,” said a statement from TalkTalk.

The scam in question involves customers getting called up and, with the stolen details, the scammers are trying to convince you that they’re a legitimate TalkTalk representative who tries to sell them security software. So, if you’re a customer and someone from TalkTalk rings you up and asks for your bank details, tell ‘em where to sling it.

paper laptop scam 300x214 Scammed MacBook man to raise money for charity with auction!Remember the fella who bought a photocopy of a MacBook for £300? Some thought it was kinda funny, while others didn’t like to see someone being scammed, leaving everyone else to shout pointlessly on about Android versus Apple.

Well, now that the hubbub has died down, the scammed man in question is trying to do something good with the whole scenario.

Paul Barrington is selling the piece of paper on eBay in a bid to raise money for the British Lung Foundation.

On the seller notes, he’s written: “Item can be a little stiff to close and sometimes a bit slow to start up. Some of the keys may appear slightly smudged and the screen is stuck on the same image.”

Arf. He’s added on the auction page: “This is clearly an auction for a piece of paper… however, this is no ordinary piece of paper because on it is photocopied in glorious black and white the picture of the laptop I thought I had purchased.”

“Now I know what you’re thinking already (trust me, I’ve read the comments) “If it looks too good to be true then it probably is?”. However, this slimline piece of paper is littered with plus points that would make the new owner the envy of his friends and colleagues. First of all how about I tell you that this piece of paper is worth at least £300? That’s right – three hundred quid. I can assure you of that because that is what I paid for it. “You deserve everything you get as you didn’t read the listing properly” I hear the other 50% of commenters cry even though they clearly haven’t read any of the previous comments stating the same thing believing that they were the first to make such a witty retort.”

“This may well be the most famous piece of photocopied paper in the world right now and has featured far and wide with its story and notoriety. I will send the paper in the same ridiculous little box that it was sent to me in and hopefully you will be slightly less disappointed than I was when it arrives.”

“As you all probably know (some of you better than me it seems) I have a small problem with my lungs or in other words they are knackered. This keeps putting me into hospital where I am now on first name terms with all the lovely staff on the ward at North Devon District Hospital. I have got my money back from eBay for the scam that I was duped into. So all of the sale price of this fine Slimline A4 laptop paper will go directly to the British Lung Foundation in the hope that they can use the money to further develop treatment and cures for people like me that just want to get better and carry on with life.”

So there you have it. He’s got his refund and is now trying to raise some money for charity with all that press he got. We’re only to happy to share this and we should hope that other outlets do too.

Click here to see the eBay auction, where 100% of proceeds will go to the British Lung Foundation.

Man buys photocopy of MacBook for £300

February 5th, 2015 7 Comments By Mof Gimmers

If you think a deal is too good to be true, chances are, it is. Unless you’re looking in our Deals of the Day, of course. Either way, if someone is offering you a MacBook for £300, you’ve got to be wary.

One man who wasn’t, was Paul Barrington who saw the deal on eBay and thought he’d got himself an absolute steal! He parted with his money and waited. When it arrived, he found he’d spent all that money on a photocopied picture of a MacBook instead.

Look at his sad face.

paper laptop scam 500x356 Man buys photocopy of MacBook for £300

Of course, MacBooks set you back around £1,500 if you’re buying them new and, if you’re getting one second-hand, they’re not going to be much cheaper.

Paul had apparently sold his treasured surfboard to buy the device, as he wanted to start gigging as a wedding DJ.

He said: “I sold my pride and joy for a piece of paper. It’s the first time I haven’t had a surfboard since I was 10 years old but I need a laptop so I checked the listing and the seller’s rating.”

“He’d been a member for a few years, so there was nothing to be suspicious about. I was excited about winning the auction and just thought, ‘I’ve got a laptop so I can start the business. The package was as light as a feather. Why bother sending a picture in a box? It doesn’t make any sense. I almost had to laugh.”

Paul has of course, reported this scam to eBay who are going to get back to him. Anyone who has dealt with eBay before, stop laughing. Here’s the auction.

Watch you don’t get hacked by WhatsApp Plus

January 22nd, 2015 2 Comments By Mof Gimmers

whatsapp Watch you dont get hacked by WhatsApp PlusHave you been using an app called WhatsApp Plus? Well, stop that at once! You see, WhatsApp have banned some users from using the app for 24 hours because it is a third party application and it violates the ‘terms of service’.

WhatsApp have asked their users to uninstall WhatsApp+ and install the authorised version of WhatsApp from official website or Google Play if they want to resume normal service. This other app isn’t related to WhatsApp, which means it has code that isn’t supported by the company and, worse still, if you get hacked and your details and photos leak, they won’t be taking any responsibility for it.

So if you’ve been sending photos of your junk to people through this third party app, you’re asking for trouble.

WhatsApp are treating the Plus app as malware and, in their FAQ section, they’ve said: “WhatsApp Plus is an application that was not developed by WhatsApp, nor is it authorised by WhatsApp. The developers of WhatsApp Plus have no relationship to WhatsApp, and we do not support WhatsApp Plus. Please be aware that WhatsApp Plus contains source code which WhatsApp cannot guarantee as safe and that your private information is potentially being passed to 3rd parties without your knowledge or authorization.”

In short – stop using it, alright? Good.

Crazy Chinese people news now, and a man has been arrested after trying to smuggle 94 iPhones into China. You might not think that this is mental at all…

…but this man tried to do it by strapping them on to his body, of course.

smuggler 500x310 Man tapes 94 iPhones on his body to smuggle into China

The man caught the attention of inspectors at the Futian crossing in Shenzhen, a southern Chinese metropolis bordering Hong Kong,  who noticed the gent was walking a little funny carrying a couple of carrier bags, and was waved through when there was nothing suspicious found in the bags.

However, when he went through the metal detector, the alarms went off and he was busted.

Photos released by customs show dozens of neatly shrink-wrapped shiny iPhones strapped around the man’s chest, abdomen, crotch and thighs with duct tape. Dude clearly went to some right effort.

iPhones are quite the thing in China, with consumers going nuts for the gadget ahead of the launch of iPhone 6 last year. Apple handsets are also more expensive in the mainland than Hong Kong, due to higher import taxes. Fr’instance, an iPhone 6 with 64 gigabytes of storage, sells for almost $1,000 in the mainland but only about $820 in Hong Kong, hence a bit of a black market has sprung up.

This isn’t the first case of iPhone smuggling the authorities have seen, Shenzhen customs officials disclosed that they have caught 18 mules strapping smuggled electronic products – including 282 iPhones – on, or in their bodies since December.

One can only applaud the audacity and madness of the man who thought “Yeah. 94 iPhones strapped on my body. That’ll work. NO ONE WILL SUSPECT A THING”.

But in Mandarin obviously.

Apple’s Spotlight opening you to hacks?

January 13th, 2015 No Comments By Mof Gimmers

sad apple logo Apples Spotlight opening you to hacks?On OS X Yosemite, you may have noticed that Apple’s Spotlight search function is rather sophisticated, allowing you to search the web as well as peering into your machine for content too. All very clever.

However, it also has a flaw that could well expose your local information to nefarious types. Not so clever.

So what’s going on? Well, the weakness focuses on Apple Mail. Basically, as Spotlight Search indexes emails that have been received within Apple’s email service, it also shows previews of your emails, your images and such.

All a hacker would need to do is to insert a tracking pixel into one of your email’s images and hey presto! They could well be enjoying access to your data!

While the email is in your inbox, you can ignore scams, but Spotlight’s preview function opens up a vulnerability. Seeing as Spotlight opens previews of your junk and spam messages, this could be a problem. Even if you have switched off the “load remote content in messages” feature, it doesn’t exactly fix the problem.

Until Apple issue a fix, the best thing for you to do is to go to your Mac System preferences and switch off email indexing.

Hurray! A crackdown on card fraud!

December 19th, 2014 No Comments By Mof Gimmers

creditcards Hurray! A crackdown on card fraud!Good news everyone – new rules have been revealed which aim to beat down on card payment fraud! Aren’t you thrilled about that?

The European Banking Authority (EBA) has shared their new, tougher guidelines, making payment service providers get serious about customer identification before payments are processed.

There’s good reason for this too – in the last four years, the yearly cost of card fraud in the UK has jumped up from £365 million to somewhere in advance of £450 million! Two thirds of that came from the dastardly practice of ‘skimming’, where small amounts of money are continually removed from an account in the hope that the victim won’t even notice.

Of course, there’s been an increase in digital snidery too, with ne’er-do-wells using malware and the like. There’s also the tried-and-tested tactic of just nicking your card too.

Anyway, all this means is that you’ll carry on as normal while fraudsters will have to learn a new set of tricks to try and get at all your precious money.

Dominos caught selling Aldi potato wedges

July 4th, 2014 9 Comments By Lucy Sweet

wedges 300x243 Dominos caught selling Aldi potato wedges Staff at a branch of Dominos in Linlithgow, West Lothian face a grilling after they were caught buying cheap jumbo bags of potato wedges from Aldi and then trying to pass them off as Domino’s own brand.

The cheapo wedges cost only 59p from Aldi, whereas Dominos wedges are a staggering £3.49 for a tiny box. But staff say they’d run out due to Wimbledon and the World Cup, and they were just trying to keep up with an unprecedented demand for wedge action.

A customer spotted what they were up to when he went in to order a pizza, and said: ‘I had a bit of a chuckle – but it’s really cheeky flogging Aldi products as their own.’

Domino’s bosses explained the problem.

‘With big sporting events in full swing, the Linlithgow store was faced with no wedges. We do not advocate this as a solution. We have spoken to the store to ensure ordering has been adjusted and our customers get Domino’s wedges.’

It’s actually pretty enterprising when you think about it – and it also very much begs the question: ‘is there a scientific correlation between major sporting events and potato wedges?’

eBay and Gumtree are riddled with scams

July 4th, 2014 2 Comments By Mof Gimmers

ebay eBay and Gumtree are riddled with scamsWe all know that eBay and Gumtree are full of scams (including some of the t&cs from the company themselves, eh readers? Eh? EH?), but just how many?

Well, the Citizens Advice have revealed that one in six complaints about products or services advertised on Gumtree, and one in 10 about sales at eBay, are scams or potential scams.

The CA’s analysis looked at 649 problem cases involving Gumtree and 3,711 at eBay.

Problems included scams advertising housing and job scams, as well as motorists buying second-hand cars and then finding out that there was a logbook loan attached.

Other scams include the classic ‘paying for something but getting nothing in return’ on things like phones and, weirdly, pets. Apparently, businesses are being stung as well as people just shopping for themselves. Companies are contacted by other firms offering cheap advertising which transpire to be cons. There’s an increase in scams on fake tickets for the Commonwealth Games, where people are being offered expensive stubs, and getting nothing back.

Citizens Advice chief executive Gillian Guy said: “Online marketplaces are at risk of becoming a hotbed for scams. These sites are an important service for buyers and sellers, but con artists are profiting from them too. Scammers are swindling people out of hundreds or thousands of pounds by posting false products and services online.”

“Con artists are preying on those still trying to get back on their feet from the recession. Fake jobs and phoney homes are taking people’s deposits that they strived and saved so long for.”

As a result, CA want eBay, Gumtree and others to police their sites better.

If you think you’ve been scammed, then visit citizensadvice.org.uk or call 03454 040506 (03454 040505 for the Welsh speakers among you).

Imagine, you’re slumbering happily, and then suddenly you wake up to a message on your phone from some mysterious dobber/s calling themselves ‘Oleg Pliss’, telling you you’ve been hacked. Not only that, but your phone will be locked until you pay them a ransom of $100 via Paypal.

oleg pliss apple ios mac 300x168 iPhone users get ‘iJacked’ by the mysterious Oleg Pliss

Well, this is what happened to Apple users across Australia in the early hours of Tuesday morning, who found themselves phoneless and iPad-less thanks to the hackers. Some were woken to alerts in the night, and others, when they came to use their devices, found that they were locked.

So who, or what, is Oleg Pliss, and how did they manage to lock random devices across a whole country? Well, users reported a breach of the ‘Find My Phone’ app – which means they could have accessed devices through the iCloud and then set them to ‘lost mode’.

Or if they users had the same passwords across a number of devices, that might explain it, too. But at the moment, nobody knows.

As for who Oleg is, there are a few theories – there’s a guy called Oleg Pliss who works as a software engineer at tech company Oracle, and a few dotted about on Linkedin in Ukraine and Russia.

Unfortunately, victims of the hacking have reported getting short shrift from Apple and mobile providers. And apparently Vodafone told one customer that ‘Apple can’t be hacked.’ (Hmm, REALLY?).

Apple have yet to comment, probably because they have no idea how Oleg and his pals actually did it…

tinder Tinder: invaded with bots carrying maliciousnessMillions of people use dating app Tinder everyday, with women focused entirely on screengrabbing men and calling them names on Twitter, and men being ignored or crudely asking for pictures of boobs.

Well, if you’re using it – be careful. Why? Well, the service has been “invaded by bots” who are pretending to be humans according to security firm BitDefender.

These bots pose as women to talk to you in a text-chat before promoting a game called Castle Clash, with a link to a site called Tinderverified.com. Of course, this has nothing to do with Tinder and the whole thing is dodgy.

Most of you would realise that, but as a public service to thundering simpletons, we should at least share this so they don’t end up going mental in the streets where the rest of humanity lives.

“The name of the URL gives the impression of an official page of the dating app and for extra legitimacy scammers also registered it on a reputable .com domain,” said Bitdefender’s chief security strategist Catalin Cosoi.

The developers of the Castle Clash game deny any involvement: ”We are already aware of this issue and we are currently investigating into it. We are also being victimised in this issue therefore we are grateful for being informed,” said the company in a statement to BitDefender.