Have plenty of time on your hands? Spammy O2 hope not…

May 6th, 2013 9 Comments By Ben Telford

BHK8hm3CYAEMD1M Have plenty of time on your hands? Spammy O2 hope not... You cant move these days without being bombarded by marketing emails, leaflet drops or text messages. As annoying as it is, at least you have the chance to opt out or delete the unwanted communication when you get around to it. That might change though as companies look to capitalise on our busy schedules…

O2, resembling a bitter and vengeful ex-girlfriend, are firing out text messages to customers wanting answers to a few questions. That sounds pretty common for text marketing but instead of putting the ball in your court, they keep hold of it by asking that you opt out but you need to do so within an hour. Fail to reply and the next message comes through. For anyone with half a life, this could be incredibly annoying and inconvenient.

We got in touch with O2 to question this particular practice of making people opt out and limiting this period to one hour. This is what they said:

Advising customers that we are about to send 5 text messages for their views (if they wish to take part) is normal practice for text feedback. With reference to the timing of one hour, I have fed your comments back to the Marketing team and they will review the content of the message.

So, would you agree that this practice is unreasonable and O2 should stop giving people a deadline to opt out of receiving further texts? Let us know.

Comments (9) Jump to most recent comment
  1. Posted by Cheesey May 6, 2013 at 3:31 pm

    Call up to make a complaint. Ask for a written resolution. When the complaints dept have to deal with 20,000 complaints that week they might stop.

  2. Posted by shiftynifty May 6, 2013 at 4:52 pm

    Oh and sort out FERAL TROLLEY OF THE WEEK …that pic has been there for weeks….surely there are newer more tragic trolleys out there…

  3. Posted by Euan May 6, 2013 at 5:23 pm

    Er .. whoopty do, five texts? Hardly the end of the world…

  4. Posted by jaffacake May 6, 2013 at 9:16 pm

    as far as I understood things, you should NEVER reply to any spam text. if you do, you are showing the spammer that the number is live and in use. if you have an Android phone you can use a free app called “mr number” to stop further texts like these…….

  5. Posted by Ben Telford May 6, 2013 at 9:24 pm

    This snippet of information was not included within the story but the recipient of this message tells us that they had actually opted out of ALL marketing emails/text from O2.

  6. Posted by Charles Dunstone May 7, 2013 at 10:54 am

    O2 BB are being taken over by Sky – what else do you expect from Murdoch scum?

  7. Posted by jimbo May 7, 2013 at 12:40 pm

    Complain to O2. Their marketing text is a foistered unilateral agreement. Your silence or non response is not an acceptance of a contract. Tell them to stop sending you all such texts immediately.

  8. Posted by O2 May 7, 2013 at 3:58 pm

    Hi Ben,

    We understand that our customers get lots of updates from brands that they connect with – in the form of texts, emails ect. We appreciate where you’re coming from.

    To ensure that our customers only get the updates they want from us, how they want them, we’ve got an opt in/out process in place.

    The message that you’ve highlighted is actually a customer satisfaction survey.

    Regardless of what the content is, your contact preferences can be changed at any time.

    We’ve seen and replied to your tweet – hopefully you’ll have seen it. If you’d like us to update your contact preferences, we’d be more than happy to do that.

    If you’d like to update your preferences yourself, head over to https://mymobile.o2.co.uk/mychoices

    Hope that clears things up a little for you. If you’d like to discuss some more, drop us a tweet.

    Thanks

    Brad
    O2 Social Media Team

  9. Hi Brad,

    The point of the article was whether it was right that O2 would just go ahead and send another text if the customer does not reply within an hour.

    Why not make them have to opt-in? Well, we all know why, because there is more chance of someone not opting out than opting in.

    Do you think that you need to reconsider this?

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